Researchers find a way to mend a broken heart

A Monash University study has uncovered for the first time a way to prevent and reverse damage caused by broken-heart syndrome, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Using mouse models, the pre-clinical study published in the acclaimed journal Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy, has shown the cardioprotective benefit of a drug called Suberanilohydroxamic acid, or SAHA, dramatically improved cardiac health and […]

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Social media ‘likes’ change the way we feel about our memories, new research shows

Memories are often considered very personal and private. Yet, in the past few years, people have got used to notifications from social media or phone galleries telling them they have a “memory.” These repackaged versions of the past affect not just what we remember but also the attachments we have with those memories. In a new study, we found social […]

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Why Turmeric Acid Is a Sure Way to Get Paparazzi Snapping Our Smiles

In the age of Instagram models and fashion bloggers, more people want to look their best whenever the camera lens shutter and flash. Getting the right pose and caption is as important as ever. However, no matter how well dressed for an occasion one may be, sometimes, the greatest asset in any photo is the smile. Revealing a set of […]

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Researchers find a better way to measure consciousness

Millions of people are administered general anesthesia each year in the United States alone, but it’s not always easy to tell whether they are actually unconscious. A small proportion of those patients regain some awareness during medical procedures, but a new study of the brain activity that represents consciousness could prevent that potential trauma. It may also help both people […]

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A new way to help the immune system fight back against cancer

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health are breaking new ground to make cancer cells more susceptible to attack by the body’s own immune system. Working in mice, a team led by Jamey Weichert, professor of radiology, and Zachary Morris, professor of human oncology, is combining two different techniques in its approach, using targeted radionuclide […]

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The surprising way scientists can trace COVID-19 outbreaks

The idea of testing sewage might sound as gross as it gets, but what if we told you that that our waste could hold the key for figuring out where coronavirus clusters are brewing?  Some scientists say it could be useful to consider testing sewage to predict where a COVID-19 cluster might appear next, because sewage can show where the […]

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Researchers seek rapid way to produce proteins necessary to assess potential vaccine components

Dr. Gerd Mittelstädt from Te Herenga Waka-Victoria University of Wellington’s Ferrier Research Institute is contributing to the search for a COVID-19 vaccine by finding a rapid way to produce the proteins needed to assess potential vaccine components. Working alongside other University researchers and the Malaghan Institute for Medical Research, as part of Vaccine Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand-Ohu Kaupare Huaketo, Dr. […]

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Diversity and Inclusion Are Important Goals—But Tokenism Isn't the Way to Do It

If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s that equality should be a priority for all of us, and the media, politics, and the corporate world need to be more diverse. And genuine intentions are key when it comes to efforts at diversity, otherwise it’s little more than tokenism.  Generally speaking, tokenism is about including someone in a group purely for […]

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