Modifiable health risks linked to more than $730 billion in US health care costs

Modifiable health risks, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and smoking, were linked to over $730 billion in health care spending in the US in 2016, according to a study published in The Lancet Public Health. Researchers from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), an independent global health research center at the University of Washington School of Medicine, […]

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Inflammatory gene provides clue to obesity risk

A gene that helps to control inflammation increases the risk of obesity and could be turned off in mice to stop weight gain, a study from The University of Queensland has found. UQ Institute for Molecular Bioscience researcher Dr. Denuja Karunakaran said she was determined to unravel the links between inflammation and obesity that went deeper than excessive eating or […]

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For Kids With Hearing Issues, Early Intervention Crucial to School Readiness

MONDAY, Sept. 28, 2020 — When babies with hearing impairments get help very early in life, they are more likely to be “kindergarten-ready” when the time comes, a new study finds. In the United States, all states have government-funded “early intervention” programs designed to assist parents whose babies are deaf or hard of hearing. Ideally, that intervention starts soon after […]

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Researchers seek rapid way to produce proteins necessary to assess potential vaccine components

Dr. Gerd Mittelstädt from Te Herenga Waka-Victoria University of Wellington’s Ferrier Research Institute is contributing to the search for a COVID-19 vaccine by finding a rapid way to produce the proteins needed to assess potential vaccine components. Working alongside other University researchers and the Malaghan Institute for Medical Research, as part of Vaccine Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand-Ohu Kaupare Huaketo, Dr. […]

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How to up your vitamin D intake – from the right foods to supplements

While there’s no need to overload your body with more vitamin D than it knows what to do with, there are plenty of benefits to making sure you’re getting enough. Not only have studies indicated that healthy levels of vitamin D could help the body fight coronavirus more effectively, but it is also important for keeping your bones, teeth and […]

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The designated driver role gets a modern update, covering dangers from COVID-19 to social media

The designated driver (DD) is a successful public health strategy dating back to the late 1980s. To better reflect the realities of today’s society, now is a good time to evolve the initiative to help mitigate the harms tied to broader substance use and beyond drinking and driving. The promotion of “buddy circles,” as an expanded harm reduction strategy, is […]

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Dynamic tattoos promise to warn wearers of health threats

In the sci-fi novel “The Diamond Age” by Neal Stephenson, body art has evolved into “constantly shifting mediatronic tattoos”—in-skin displays powered by nanotech robopigments. In the 25 years since the novel was published, nanotechnology has had time to catch up, and the sci-fi vision of dynamic tattoos is starting to become a reality. The first examples of color-changing nanotech tattoos […]

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Statins reduce COVID-19 severity, likely by removing cholesterol that virus uses to infect

There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatments for COVID-19, the pandemic infection caused by a novel coronavirus. While several therapies are being tested in clinical trials, current standard of care involves providing patients with fluids and fever-reducing medications. To speed the search for new COVID-19 therapies, researchers are testing repurposed drugs—medicines already known to be safe for human […]

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Coronavirus: The road to vaccine roll-out is always bumpy, as 20th-century pandemics show

If you have been following the media coverage of the new vaccines in development for COVID-19, it will be clear that the stakes are high. Very few vaccine trials in history have attracted so much attention, perhaps since polio in the mid-20th century. A now largely forgotten chapter, summer polio outbreaks invoked terror in parents. Today, restrictions on gatherings and […]

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Study examines women’s attitudes toward long-acting injectable therapy to prevent HIV

Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a highly effective method of reducing risk for HIV, yet use of PrEP is uniformly low, especially among women. As a result, researchers have developed long-acting injectable (LAI) versions of PrEP, one version of which was recently shown to be superior to oral PrEP in Phase 3 trials. A new study among women at high […]

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