New insight to Campylobacter sensor structures could lead to targeted antibiotic development

Researchers from the Institute of Glycomics have identified a novel bacterial sensor in Campylobacter species that enable the pathogenic cells to find suitable host cells. The findings have been published in Science Signalling. Campylobacter bacteria are the leading cause of food-borne illness, contributing to enteritis and other gastrointestinal distress we commonly identify as “food poisoning.” About one percent of the […]

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Alternative cancer cell fuel source targeted as therapeutic approach for breast cancer

Scientists at The Wistar Institute characterized an inhibitor that targets acetate metabolism in cancer cells. Cancer cells use acetate metabolism to support tumor growth in conditions of low nutrient and oxygen availability. This molecule caused tumor growth inhibition and regression in preclinical studies, demonstrating the promise of this approach as a novel therapeutic strategy for solid tumors. Study results were […]

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Blood test picks out cancers likely to benefit from targeted drugs

A simple and inexpensive blood test could pick out patients with stomach or oesophageal cancer who are likely to benefit from targeted treatment, a new study shows. The test, known as a liquid biopsy, detects cancer DNA in the bloodstream to reveal if stomach and oesophageal cancers are being driven by the presence of too many copies of a gene […]

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Targeted inhibitor of mutated KRAS gene shows promise in lung, bowel, other solid tumors

A novel agent that targets a mutated form of the KRAS gene—the most commonly altered oncogene in human cancers and one long considered “undruggable”—shrank tumors in most patients in a clinical trial with manageable side effects, researchers reported today at the 32nd EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Therapeutic, which is taking place online. The KRYSTAL-1 (NCT03785249) phase I/II trial […]

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Novel targeted drug induced positive response for VHL-associated kidney cancer

In an international trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, treatment with MK-6482, the small molecule inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2a was well tolerated and resulted in clinical responses for patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL)-associated renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The results of the Phase II trial were shared today in an oral presentation […]

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One’s internal clock could be targeted to prevent or slow the progression of breast cancer

City of Hope scientists have identified an unlikely way to potentially prevent or slow the progression of aggressive breast cancer: target one’s internal clock. Often taken for granted, the circadian rhythm is gaining traction as a potential catalyst or brake for the onset of disease. For example, studies have shown that women who take frequent night shifts have disrupted internal […]

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Researchers identify targeted therapy that can help children with deadly nerve cancer

Mount Sinai researchers have identified a targeted therapy for adolescent patients with neuroblastoma, a deadly pediatric nerve cancer, who would otherwise have no treatment options, according to a study published in October in Cancer Cell. Neuroblastoma is one of the most common and aggressive pediatric nervous system tumors and generally has a poor prognosis, particularly when it advances in older […]

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Targeted interventions raise HPV vaccine acceptance in women

(HealthDay)—Among young women, targeted educational interventions, particularly educational videos, increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptability and knowledge, according to a study published online July 9 in Obstetrics & Gynecology. Lori Cory, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania and the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted an exploratory investigation to discover baseline acceptance of the prophylactic HPV vaccine […]

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Discovery of mechanism behind precision cancer drug opens door for more targeted treatment

New research that uncovers the mechanism behind the newest generation of cancer drugs is opening the door for better targeted therapy. PARP inhibitors are molecular targeted cancer drugs used to treat women with ovarian cancer who have the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations. The drugs are showing promise in late-stage clinical trials for breast cancer, prostate cancer and pancreatic cancer […]

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