Study profiles immune cells fighting COVID-19, may help guide next-gen vaccine development

Even as the first vaccines for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are being distributed, scientists and clinicians around the world have remained steadfast in their efforts to better understand how the human immune system responds to the virus and protects people against it. Now, a research team—led by Johns Hopkins Medicine and in collaboration with ImmunoScape, a U.S.-Singapore biotechnology […]

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Nixing bone cancer fuel supply offers new treatment approach, mouse study suggests

An innovative approach to treating bone tumors—starving cancer cells of the energy they need to grow—could one day provide an alternative to a commonly used chemotherapy drug without the risk of severe side effects, suggests a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Studying human cancer cells and mice, the researchers said that a two-drug combination […]

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Drink and drug risk is lower among optimistic pupils with ‘happy’ memories, says study

Teenagers with happy childhood memories are likely to drink less, take fewer drugs and enjoy learning, according to research published in the peer-reviewed journal Addiction Research & Theory. The findings, based on data from nearly 2,000 US high school students, show a link between how pupils feel about the past, present and future and their classroom behavior. This in turn […]

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New study suggests link between problem gambling and suicidality in young adults in Great Britain

Results from a cross-sectional online survey of young adults between the ages of 16-24 suggests that both men and women are at increased risk of suicidality if they engage in problem gambling. Suicide is a leading cause of death of young adults worldwide. Research also suggests that the suicide rate has increased for young adults in recent years, despite the […]

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Mathematical study describes how metastasis starts

A scientific study carried out by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) has produced a mathematical description of the way in which a tumor invades the epithelial cells and automatically quantifies the progression of the tumor and the remaining cell islands after its progression. The model developed by these researchers could be […]

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Study: minorities should be designated vulnerable to COVID

Researchers writing in a British Medical Journal are recommending that ethnic minorities should be considered “extremely vulnerable” to COVID-19, a distinction that could give groups hard-hit by the pandemic earlier access to potentially life-saving vaccines. This suggestion is one of six made by the authors of an analysis published Friday in The BMJ. They say “systemic racism” is the fundamental […]

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Many summer camps don’t require childhood immunizations, study finds

While most children need to show immunization records to attend school, the same may not be true for camps, a new study suggests. Nearly half of summer camps surveyed by researchers didn’t have official policies requiring campers be vaccinated, according to findings led by Michigan Medicine C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in JAMA Pediatrics. Of 378 camps represented, just 174 reportedly […]

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Even mild cases of COVID can leave "long-haul" illness, study shows

(HealthDay)—Even people with mild cases of COVID-19 may commonly feel run down and unwell months later, a new study suggests. The study, of patients at one Irish medical center, found that 62% said they had not returned to “full health” when they had a follow-up appointment a few months after their COVID-19 diagnosis. Nearly half complained of ongoing fatigue. Surprisingly, […]

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Pfizer study suggests COVID-19 vaccine works against virus variant

New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two easier-to-spread variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They carry multiple mutations but share one in common that’s believed to be the reason they are more contagious. Called N501Y, it is a slight alteration on […]

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Those with mild coronavirus experience loss of taste, smell in 86% of cases: study

New coronavirus strain is about 70% more transmissible: expert University of Washington Chief Strategy Officer of Population Health Dr. Ali Mokdad reacts to the new strain of coronavirus reaching the United States. A loss of taste and smell has become a telltale sign of a coronavirus infection for many, experts have said, with a new study published this week finding just […]

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