Imaging markers developed to facilitate diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia

Around four in a thousand people worldwide suffer from schizophrenia, according to scientific estimates. The disease affects people from all walks of life, including Vincent van Gogh, the painter Agnes Martin, mathematician John Nash and Eduard Einstein, a son of the great physicist. The disease affects men and women equally. Despite its prevalence, however, schizophrenia has remained a mystery. Diagnosis […]

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Determined DNA hunt reveals schizophrenia clue

An 18-year study using the DNA of thousands of people in India has identified a new clue in the quest for causes of schizophrenia, and for potential treatments. University of Queensland and Indian researchers searched the genomes of more than 3000 individuals and found those with schizophrenia were more likely to have a particular genetic variation. Professor Bryan Mowry from […]

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Broccoli sprout extracts may help manage schizophrenia

Drugs used to treat schizophrenia don't work completely for everyone, and they can cause a variety of undesirable side effects, including metabolic problems increasing cardiovascular risk, involuntary movements, restlessness, stiffness and "the shakes." A chemical derived from broccoli sprouts can be used to manage schizophrenia symptoms, scientists have found, paving the way for treatments that reduces unwanted side effects of […]

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Researchers find high-risk genes for schizophrenia

Using a unique computational framework they developed, a team of scientist cyber-sleuths in the Vanderbilt University Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and the Vanderbilt Genetics Institute (VGI) has identified 104 high-risk genes for schizophrenia. Their discovery, which was reported April 15 in the journal Nature Neuroscience, supports the view that schizophrenia is a developmental disease, one which potentially can […]

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Experiments with roundworms suggest alternatives for the treatment of schizophrenia: Researchers used C. elegans as an animal model to investigate the importance of certain human genes for the treatment of schizophrenia.

A group of Brazilian scientists have long conducted experiments with roundworms to investigate the role of schizophrenia-linked genes in patients’ response to antipsychotic drugs. The results obtained thus far point to new ways of understanding resistance to certain classes of medication. The studies are conducted by researchers in the Pharmacology Department of the Federal University of São Paulo’s Medical School […]

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Case study: Bartonella and sudden-onset adolescent schizophrenia

In a new case study, researchers at North Carolina State University describe an adolescent human patient diagnosed with rapid onset schizophrenia who was found instead to have a Bartonella henselae infection. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that Bartonella infection can mimic a host of chronic illnesses, including mental illness, and could open up new avenues of […]

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Researcher: Are infectious diseases, the trigger for mental illness?

Infections can, apparently, lead to mental disorders A Danish study is a suspicious Overlap in the statistics between infections and mental illness. The scientists suspect a connection. 80 per cent probability of a mental disorder Ole Köhler-Forsberg and his Team from Aarhus University Hospital found in a observational study: children and young people who have been treated for an infection, […]

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Gender and schizophrenia

New research from University of Dayton psychologist Julie Walsh-Messinger and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai psychiatrist Dolores Malaspina uncovers key differences in the brains of men and women suffering from schizophrenia. “For a long time, researchers overlooked that men and women are neurobiologically different,” said Walsh-Messinger, an assistant professor. “A lot of research was conducted on males and […]

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