Exposure to greenspace linked to lower risk for pediatric-onset IBD

(HealthDay)—Higher exposure to residential greenspace in childhood is associated with a reduced risk for pediatric-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Michael Elten, from the University of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada, and colleagues conducted a retrospective cohort study using linked population-based health administrative and environmental data sets. […]

Read more

Older women who ate more plant protein had lower risk of premature, dementia-related death

Postmenopausal women who ate high levels of plant protein had lower risks of premature death, cardiovascular disease and dementia-related death compared with women who ate less plant proteins, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association. Previous research has shown an association between diets high […]

Read more

Largest comprehensive Middle East GWAS reveals Arab genetic risk factors

A group of researchers at Qatar Foundation have reported the first and largest genetic association study in the Middle East, that has been published online in Nature Communications—a leading a peer-reviewed, open access, scientific journal published by Nature Research. The study titled “Whole genome sequencing in the Middle Eastern Qatari population identifies genetic associations with 45 clinically relevant traits” highlights […]

Read more

Lonely adolescents are susceptible to internet addiction: Increasing numbers at risk in the coronavirus situation

Loneliness is a risk factor associated with adolescents being drawn into compulsive internet use. The risk of compulsive use has grown in the coronavirus pandemic: loneliness has become increasingly prevalent among adolescents, who spend longer and longer periods of time online. A study investigating detrimental internet use by adolescents involved a total of 1,750 Finnish study subjects, who were studied […]

Read more

People infected with COVID-19 have a higher risk of dying after a cardiac arrest

COVID-19 patients who suffer a cardiac arrest either in or out of hospital are far more likely to die than patients who are not infected with the coronavirus. In particular, women have the highest risk of dying: they are nine times more likely to die after suffering a cardiac arrest in hospital, according to research published today in the European […]

Read more

Link found between time perception, risk for developmental coordination disorder

Neuroscientists at McMaster University have found a link between children who are at risk for developmental coordination disorder (DCD), a common condition that can cause clumsiness, and difficulties with time perception such as interpreting changes in rhythmic beats. Accurate time perception is crucial for basic skills such as walking and processing speech and music. “Many developmental disorders, including dyslexia or […]

Read more

Liver cancer ‘signature’ in gut holds clues to cancer risk

People with non-alcohol-related liver cancer have a unique gut microbiome profile which could help predict disease risk, a UNSW Sydney study has found. The distinctive gut microbiome profile of a person with liver cancer linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) could be the key to predicting someone’s risk of developing the cancer, say researchers from the UNSW Microbiome Research […]

Read more

Limiting Cardiovascular Risk Using Akkermansia

Akkermansia muciniphila is a mucin-degrading bacterium found in the human intestine. Recently, studies have shown that A. muciniphila is potentially effective in reducing the risk of developing cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Image Credit: MDGRPHCS/Shutterstock.com How bacteria can benefit human systems? According to research using a mouse model, one type of intestinal bacterium, A. muciniphila, can reduce the risk of developing […]

Read more

Automated AI algorithm uses routine imaging to predict cardiovascular risk

Coronary artery calcification—the buildup of calcified plaque in the walls of the heart’s arteries—is an important predictor of adverse cardiovascular events like heart attacks. Coronary calcium can be detected by computed tomography (CT) scans, but quantifying the amount of plaque requires radiological expertise, time and specialized equipment. In practice, even though chest CT scans are fairly common, calcium score CTs […]

Read more

Livestock workers face high MRSA risk

For Michigan State University’s Felicia Wu, the surprise isn’t that people who work with livestock are at higher risk of picking up antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but instead how much higher their risk levels are. “This is a bit of a wakeup call,” said Wu, John. A Hannah Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Food Science and Human Nutrition and Agricultural, Food […]

Read more
1 2 3 15