Type of heart failure may influence treatment strategies in patients with AFib

Among patients with both heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AFib), treatment strategies focused on controlling the heart rhythm (using catheter ablation) and those focused on controlling the heart rate (using drugs and/or a pacemaker) showed no significant differences in terms of death from any cause or progression of heart failure, according to a study presented at the American College of […]

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Odds of catching COVID at dentist’s office very low, study shows

Do yon need to have your teeth cleaned or a cavity filled? Go ahead. Dental treatment won’t put you at risk for contracting COVID-19, a new study affirms. “Getting your teeth cleaned does not increase your risk for COVID-19 infection any more than drinking a glass of water from the dentist’s office does,” said lead author Purnima Kumar, a professor […]

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University of Washington study suggests COVID-19 deaths far higher than official reports

A team of researchers at the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) has found evidence that suggests the number of people who have died due to COVID-19 is much higher than official reports would indicate. They have undertaken a country-by-country analysis of deaths due to COVID-19 that includes factors associated with the pandemic as a whole […]

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New class of drug gives hope to some ovarian cancer patients

A study published today in Nature Communications shows that the drug rucaparib has been effective in treating certain types of ovarian cancers if used early in treatment, after a diagnosis, and before the cancer cells build up a resistance to chemotherapy. Rucaparib is in a relatively new class of drugs—Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase or PARP inhibitors—which have been approved for therapy in ovarian cancers. […]

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Low doses of radiation may improve quality of life for those with severe Alzheimer’s

Individuals living with severe Alzheimer’s disease showed remarkable improvements in behavior and cognition within days of receiving an innovative new treatment that delivered low doses of radiation, a recent Baycrest-Sunnybrook pilot study found. “The primary goal of a therapy for Alzheimer’s disease should be to improve the patient’s quality of life. We want to optimize their well-being and restore communication […]

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Tailor-made therapy of multi-resistant tuberculosis

Globally, tuberculosis is the most common bacterial infectious disease leading to death. The pathogen causing tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has a number of peculiarities. One is that it is growing very slowly. While other typical pathogens, such as pneumococcal and pseudomonads, can already be identified by their growth in the microbiological laboratory in the first 72 hours, several weeks usually pass […]

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New use of imaging technique could allow early detection of aortic aneurysms

Ascending thoracic aortic aneurisms (aTAAs) occur when the walls of the aorta, the largest blood vessel in the body, weaken and begin to bulge. This can result in rupture or dissection (a tear in the aortic wall), leading to life-threatening bleeding and death. Sometimes these complications can occur before any symptoms of the aneurysm appear. However, an international team led […]

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A new strain of a well-known probiotic might offer help for infants’ intestinal problems

Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG, or LGG, is the most studied probiotic bacterium in the world. However, its features are not perfect, as it is unable to utilize the milk carbohydrate lactose or break down the milk protein casein. This is why the bacterium grows poorly in milk and why it has to be separately added to probiotic dairy products. In fact, […]

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Progression of cardiac hypertrophy in dialysis patients can be slowed by drugs

Patients with chronic kidney dysfunction frequently develop thickening of the heart muscle, so-called left ventricular hypertrophy. This is particularly pronounced in patients who are in the late stage of renal dysfunction, that is to say those requiring renal replacement therapy such as haemodialysis. The danger of this cardiac hypertrophy lies in the considerable associated increase in risk of acute cardiovascular […]

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Colorado’s “fourth wave” of COVID-19 isn’t the worst in the country, but there’s no sign it’s over yet

Colorado’s “fourth wave” of COVID-19 isn’t among the absolute worst spikes in the country, but it’s difficult to tell where it might go in the second half of April. Hospitalizations in Colorado from confirmed or suspected COVID-19 increased 33% from March 18 through Sunday, which was the 14th-highest rate of increase in the country. It’s nowhere near as bad as […]

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