Medical trial meets one primary endpoint in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

Sacubitril/valsartan reduces NT-proBNP, a biomarker predictive of long-term clinical outcomes in heart failure, but does not improve functional capacity compared to individualized background therapy in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. That’s the main finding of the PARALLAX trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) affects […]

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Medical intelligence sleuths tracked, warned of new coronavirus – The Denver Post

WASHINGTON — In late February when President Donald Trump was urging Americans not to panic over the novel coronavirus, alarms were sounding at a little-known intelligence unit situated on a U.S. Army base an hour’s drive north of Washington. Intelligence, science and medical professionals at the National Center for Medical Intelligence were quietly doing what they have done for decades […]

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In the Eye of the Coronavirus Testing Storm: Robert Redfield of the C.D.C.

“Certainly this administration has been cited repeatedly for appointing people to important positions who did not have the relevant expertise,” said Chris Beyrer, an epidemiology professor at Johns Hopkins who has collaborated on research with Dr. Redfield over the years. “But you wouldn’t say that about Bob Redfield. He’s a very seasoned public health person, and he certainly has led […]

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Medical school mistreatment tied to race, gender, and sexual orientation

Medical school students are being mistreated by fellow students, medical faculty, and supervising residents based on their race, gender, and sexual orientation, according to a new study led by Yale University researchers. The study, which examined 27,504 student surveys representing all 140 accredited medical schools in the United States., found that women, under-represented minority (URM), Asian, multiracial, and lesbian, gay, […]

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Medical alarms may be inaudible to hospital staff

Thousands of alarms are generated each day in any given hospital, but there are many reasons why humans may fail to respond to medical alarms, including trouble hearing the alarm. New research from the University of Illinois at Chicago looked at one common issue that affects alarm perceivability—simultaneous masking. “We know that our sensory system works as a filter and […]

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The medical miracle that could cure the blind

How will graphene benefit our health and wellbeing? One million times thinner than a human hair, medical miracle that could cure the blind Graphene promises to transform way doctors treat and prevent major illnesses Aims of fixing broken hearts, healing severed spines and treating worn-out joints Substance made in lab, by processing graphite until it’s thickness of single atom Take […]

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Could sound waves bring us smarter medical implants?

Pinned to a wall in Tommaso Melodia’s office, next to a stack of wireless technology guidebooks, is a child’s illustration: a smiling heart symbol alongside the word “Papa.” His office is covered with drawings like these, drawings suggesting that this Northeastern engineering professor and father of four has touched the hearts of his children. And someday—through next-generation pacemakers that emit […]

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Shoppers Drug Mart to use blockchain technology to track medical cannabis quality

The vice-president of business development at Shoppers Drug Mart says blockchain technology can provide a comfort level for doctors and pharmacists about the quality of medical cannabis. Ken Weisbrod says his company has signed a deal with TruTrace Technologies for a pilot program to provide the software to track medical cannabis from seed to final product. He says the source […]

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For busy medical students, two-hour meditation study may be as beneficial as longer course

For time-crunched medical students, taking a two-hour introductory class on mindfulness may be just as beneficial for reducing stress and depression as taking an eight-week meditation course, a Rutgers study finds. The study, conducted by researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, is published in the journal Medical Science Educator. The researchers say many medical students would like to […]

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