Coffee and tea drinking may be associated with reduced rates of stroke and dementia

Drinking coffee or tea may be associated with a lower risk of stroke and dementia, according to a study of healthy individuals aged 50-74 publishing November 16th in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. Drinking coffee was also associated with a lower risk of post-stroke dementia. Strokes are life-threatening events which cause 10 percent of deaths globally. Dementia is a general […]

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Depression, anxiety may be linked to c-section risk among pregnant women

Depression and anxiety in pregnant women may be connected to the type of delivery they have, new research suggests. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders have already been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes like low birth weight and preterm birth. And now, a new Michigan Medicine study finds that they may also be linked to significantly higher rates of first time cesarean deliveries […]

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Magnetic seizure therapy may be attractive alternative to electricity

Treatment-resistant depression or TRD is exactly what it sounds like: a form of mental illness that defies effective therapy. It is not rare, with an estimated 3 million persons in the United States suffering from TRD.  In a novel study, published in the October 19, 2021 online issue of The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, an international team of scientists led […]

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New ‘almanac’ may help clinicians better tailor cancer treatments

Researchers have developed a tool that integrates a variety of molecular data from patients and tumors, with the goal of guiding precision medicine. A promise of precision cancer medicine is for oncologists to tailor treatment based on a patient’s unique molecular profile. In practice, however, interpreting the vast array of data points which make up a person and their cancer […]

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Alzheimers drug may help maintain mitochondrial function in muscles as it slows cognitive decline

A common treatment for Alzheimer’s disease may help people with the earliest stages of the disease maintain mitochondrial function in their muscles in addition to slowing cognitive decline. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in Function. Research suggests people with Alzheimer’s disease, a form of cognitive impairment, have mitochondrial dysfunction throughout the body. Mitochondria, often described as the […]

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Mouth bacteria may explain why some kids hate broccoli

When confronted with the tiniest forkful of cauliflower or broccoli, some kids can’t help but scrunch up their faces in disgust. But don’t blame them — a new study hints that specific enzymes in spit might make cruciferous vegetables taste particularly vile to some children. These enzymes, called cysteine lyases, are produced by different kinds of bacteria that live in […]

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Telehealth services may help smokers in rural prisons quit tobacco smoking

Telehealth smoking cessation treatment programs can reduce tobacco-related disparities among incarcerated smokers, according to a Rutgers study. The study, published in the Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, found that video conferencing with tobacco treatment specialists may help smokers incarcerated in rural prisons quit tobacco smoking. “Tobacco use is an important public health issue, especially among people who are incarcerated, in […]

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Psychological capital may be the antidote for working in a pandemic, study suggests

Just like the COVID-19 vaccine protects against contracting the contagious virus, the collective elements of self-efficacy, optimism, hope and resiliency help inoculate employees from the negative effects of working through a pandemic, according to a new West Virginia University study. Jeffery Houghton, management professor, had studied how college students coped with stress through adaptive (i.e. exercise, meditation, social networking) and […]

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