Type of heart failure may influence treatment strategies in patients with AFib

Among patients with both heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AFib), treatment strategies focused on controlling the heart rhythm (using catheter ablation) and those focused on controlling the heart rate (using drugs and/or a pacemaker) showed no significant differences in terms of death from any cause or progression of heart failure, according to a study presented at the American College of […]

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Low doses of radiation may improve quality of life for those with severe Alzheimer’s

Individuals living with severe Alzheimer’s disease showed remarkable improvements in behavior and cognition within days of receiving an innovative new treatment that delivered low doses of radiation, a recent Baycrest-Sunnybrook pilot study found. “The primary goal of a therapy for Alzheimer’s disease should be to improve the patient’s quality of life. We want to optimize their well-being and restore communication […]

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Targeted antitobacco ads may not be as effective as ads for all audiences

Antitobacco media campaigns that directly target vulnerable minority groups may be no more effective for the intended group than more broadly appealing ads, according to a Penn State study. However, antitobacco messages may evoke anger toward the industry regardless of the audience. In the study, the researchers tested the efficacy of antitobacco advertising that targeted two vulnerable groups—Black individuals and […]

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Sexual receptivity and rejection may be orchestrated by the same brain region

In many species, including humans and mice, the fluctuating levels of the hormones progesterone and estrogen determine whether the female is fertile or not. And in the case of mice, whether she’s sexually receptive or not. The change in receptivity is striking. Female mice shift from accepting sexual partners to aggressively rejecting them across a cycle of six short days. […]

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COVID-19 booster shots may be needed within 12 months, US officials say

People vaccinated against COVID-19 may require booster shots within nine to 12 months of their initial vaccination, Reuters reported. Evidence suggests that the coronavirus vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna offer at least six months of robust protection from COVID-19 infection. But even if this protection lasts for longer, several highly-transmissible viral variants are now circulating; that means people may […]

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‘Magic mushroom’ compound may work just as well as antidepressants, small study finds

Psilocybin, the hallucinogen found in “magic mushrooms,” may work just as well as a common antidepressant drug at treating symptoms of depression, a small new study suggests. The study found that people who took psilocybin twice under the supervision of psychiatrists showed similar reductions in depression symptoms — based on scores on a survey — compared with people who took […]

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Study finds those late night snacks may be hurting you at work

A recent study finds that unhealthy eating behaviors at night can make people less helpful and more withdrawn the next day at work. “For the first time, we have shown that healthy eating immediately affects our workplace behaviors and performance,” says Seonghee “Sophia” Cho, corresponding author of the study and an assistant professor of psychology at North Carolina State University. […]

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AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine data may be outdated, US safety board says

An independent group of medical experts in the U.S. has raised concerns that AstraZeneca may have released “outdated” data on its COVID-19 vaccine. AstraZeneca announced on Monday (March 22) that its coronavirus vaccine was 79% effective at preventing symptomatic COVID-19 and 100% effective at preventing severe or critical illness and hospitalization in a late-stage trial conducted in the U.S. that […]

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