New ‘almanac’ may help clinicians better tailor cancer treatments

Researchers have developed a tool that integrates a variety of molecular data from patients and tumors, with the goal of guiding precision medicine. A promise of precision cancer medicine is for oncologists to tailor treatment based on a patient’s unique molecular profile. In practice, however, interpreting the vast array of data points which make up a person and their cancer […]

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Alzheimers drug may help maintain mitochondrial function in muscles as it slows cognitive decline

A common treatment for Alzheimer’s disease may help people with the earliest stages of the disease maintain mitochondrial function in their muscles in addition to slowing cognitive decline. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in Function. Research suggests people with Alzheimer’s disease, a form of cognitive impairment, have mitochondrial dysfunction throughout the body. Mitochondria, often described as the […]

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Mouth bacteria may explain why some kids hate broccoli

When confronted with the tiniest forkful of cauliflower or broccoli, some kids can’t help but scrunch up their faces in disgust. But don’t blame them — a new study hints that specific enzymes in spit might make cruciferous vegetables taste particularly vile to some children. These enzymes, called cysteine lyases, are produced by different kinds of bacteria that live in […]

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Telehealth services may help smokers in rural prisons quit tobacco smoking

Telehealth smoking cessation treatment programs can reduce tobacco-related disparities among incarcerated smokers, according to a Rutgers study. The study, published in the Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, found that video conferencing with tobacco treatment specialists may help smokers incarcerated in rural prisons quit tobacco smoking. “Tobacco use is an important public health issue, especially among people who are incarcerated, in […]

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Psychological capital may be the antidote for working in a pandemic, study suggests

Just like the COVID-19 vaccine protects against contracting the contagious virus, the collective elements of self-efficacy, optimism, hope and resiliency help inoculate employees from the negative effects of working through a pandemic, according to a new West Virginia University study. Jeffery Houghton, management professor, had studied how college students coped with stress through adaptive (i.e. exercise, meditation, social networking) and […]

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Having someone to talk to may help stave off Alzheimer's, study claims

Having someone to talk to could help stave off Alzheimer’s in middle-aged people, study claims Having a ‘good listener’ among your friends and family can help prevent Alzheimer’s and slow down the rate at which the brain ages by up to four years, according to researchers.  They found older adults with a healthy social support network had brains that were, […]

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Covid lockdowns may have triggered a rise in short-sighted children

Covid lockdowns may have triggered a rise in short-sighted children because they’ve spent less time outdoors and more on computers and watching TV, study claims During Covid lockdowns, children spent less time outdoors and more time inside This may have prompted rise in cases of short-sightedness (myopia), experts say Researchers studied the eyes of 1,793 children in Hong Kong Their […]

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First signs of MS may often go undiagnosed

Early symptoms of multiple sclerosis may commonly be missed for years before the right diagnosis is made, a new study suggests. Researchers found that patients with MS had a higher-than-average number of medical appointments, with doctors of various specialties, for up to five years before their diagnosis. And for the most part, those visits were for neurological symptoms consistent with […]

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