Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM

A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend. Using data obtained from 44 science courses across multiple institutions — including Cornell, the University of Minnesota, Bethel University and American University in Cairo — a team […]

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Older adults: Daunted by a new task? Learn 3 instead: Learning multiple things simultaneously increases cognitive abilities in older adults

Learning several new things at once increases cognitive abilities in older adults, according to new research from UC Riverside. UCR psychologist Rachel Wu says one important way of staving off cognitive decline is learning new skills as a child would. That is, be a sponge: seek new skills to learn; maintain motivation as fuel; rely on encouraging mentors to guide […]

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New technique developed to detect autism in children

Researchers have developed a new technique to help doctors more quickly and accurately detect autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children. In a study led by the University of Waterloo, researchers characterized how children with ASD scan a person’s face differently than a neuro-typical child. Based on the findings, the researchers were able to develop a technique that considers how a […]

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Americans overestimate income for children from wealthy families: Public also underestimates value of a college degree in mobility

Americans overestimate the future income for children from wealthy and middle-income families, but underestimate that for children from poor ones, finds a new study by New York University sociologists. The research, which appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), runs counter to popular perceptions, as well as to some previous research, that holds Americans, overall, […]

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What we think we know — but might not — pushes us to learn more: New findings challenge the popular assumption that curiosity in general is the prime driver of learning

Spoiler alert if you haven’t watched the “Game of Thrones” season finale. If you think you know the farm animal most closely related to T-Rex, or the American president who inspired the creation of blue jelly beans — but aren’t entirely sure — you’re more likely to bone up on the chicken-dinosaur connection or Ronald Reagan’s predilection for glazed, gel-filled […]

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Unlike men, women’s cognitive performance may improve at higher room temperature

Women’s performance on math and verbal tests is best at higher temperatures, while men perform best on the same tests at lower temperatures, according to a study published May 22, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tom Chang and Agne Kajackaite from the USC Marshall School of Business, Los Angeles, USA, and the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, […]

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Automatic neurological disease diagnosis using deep learning: Analyzing brain waveforms using neuroimaging big data helps improve diagnosis accuracy

A team of researchers from Osaka University and The University of Tokyo developed MNet, an automatic diagnosis system for neurological diseases using magnetoencephalography (MEG) , demonstrating the possibility of making automatic neurological disease diagnoses using MEG. Their research results were published in Scientific Reports. MEG and electroencephalography (EEG) are essential for diagnosing neurological diseases such as epilepsy. MEG allows for […]

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Mobile devices don’t reduce shared family time: New research shows that mobile device use is now embedded into family life

The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less — but not in shared activities such as watching tv and eating. The increase is in what is called ‘alone-together’ time, when children are at […]

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Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role

People fall in love for many reasons — similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. But if they marry and stay together, their long-term happiness may depend on their individual genes or those of their spouse, says a new study led by Yale School of Public Health researchers. Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the study examined the […]

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Sitting in front of the TV puts kids in the obesity hotseat

The simple act of switching on the TV for some downtime could be making a bigger contribution to childhood obesity than we realise, according to new research from the University of South Australia. The study investigated the impact of different sitting behaviours — watching television, playing video games, playing computer, sitting down to eat, or travelling in a car — […]

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