Russian President Putin gets 2nd COVID-19 vaccine shot

MOSCOW — Russian President Vladimir Putin said Wednesday he got his second COVID-19 vaccine shot, three weeks after getting the first dose. The Russian leader announced getting the jab, which was kept out of the public eye, at a session of the Russian Geographical Society, in which he took part via video link. “Right now, before entering this hall, I […]

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US allows 2 more over-the-counter COVID-19 home tests

WASHINGTON — U.S. health officials have authorized two more over-the-counter COVID-19 tests that can be used at home to get rapid results. The move by the Food and Drug Administration is expected to vastly expand the availability of cheap home tests that many experts have advocated since the early days of the outbreak. The announcement late Wednesday comes as U.S. […]

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Chicago hospital CEO suspended after improper vaccinations

CHICAGO — A Chicago hospital’s CEO has been suspended for two weeks following a series of COVID-19 vaccination events involving alleged favoritism, including one in which ineligible Trump Tower workers were vaccinated. The unpaid suspension of Loretto Hospital’s president and CEO, George Miller, is on hold until the hospital finds a new chief operating officer and chief financial officer, a […]

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'My legs were shaking': elderly Spaniards thrilled to go out

MADRID — A group of elderly Spaniards got a long-awaited treat Monday: a trip out of their care homes for the first time in many months amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The surprise destination for their outing left them gaping at breath-taking views over Madrid from a glass bridge 100 meters (330 feet) above the city street. Recent vaccinations against the […]

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AP-NORC poll: People of color bear COVID-19's economic brunt

NEW YORK — A year ago, Elvia Banuelos’ life was looking up. The 39-year-old mother of two young children said she felt confident about a new management-level job with the U.S. Census Bureau — she would earn money to supplement the child support she receives to keep her children healthy, happy and in day care. But when the coronavirus was […]

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MS patient sues Austria over health impact of climate change

BERLIN — A man in Austria with a temperature-dependent form of multiple sclerosis is taking his government to court in an effort to force it to do more against climate change, his lawyers said Tuesday. The case being filed next month before the European Court of Human Rights is supported by the environmental group Fridays for Future, which is helping […]

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New yardstick offers diagnostic and treatment guidance for idiopathic anaphylaxis: Guidelines on next steps when there is no clear cause of severe reactions

Many people in danger of the severe allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis understand exactly what they need to avoid to stay safe. For some it’s an allergy to food, for others it can be insect stings, medications, hormones or even physical factors like exercise. But according to the new “Idiopathic Anaphylaxis Yardstick,” there are people for whom diagnosis and treatment […]

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Kidney disease: Senescent cell burden is reduced in humans by senolytic drugs

In a small safety and feasibility clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated for the first time that senescent cells can be removed from the body using drugs termed “senolytics.” The result was verified not only in analysis of blood but also in changes in skin and fat tissue senescent cell abundance. The findings appear in the journal EBioMedicine. This […]

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Simple model captures almost 100 years of measles dynamics in London: Disease dynamics are well predicted despite major disruptions caused by historical events

A simple epidemiological model accurately captures long-term measles transmission dynamics in London, including major perturbations triggered by historical events. Alexander Becker of Princeton University in New Jersey, U.S., and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. Previous studies have extensively explored how disease outbreaks are affected by variations in demography, such as birth rate, and variations in person-to-person contact, […]

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Why HIV patients are more likely to develop tuberculosis: Discovery could lead to new added therapy for HIV patients

Tuberculosis and HIV — two of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases — are far worse when they occur together. Now, Texas Biomedical Research Institute researchers have pinpointed an important mechanism at work in this troubling health problem. And, their discovery could lead to a new mode of treatment for people at risk. The results were published in the Journal of […]

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