Flavors added to vaping devices can damage the heart

The appealing array of fruit and candy flavors that entice millions of young people take up vaping can harm their hearts, a preclinical study by University of South Florida Health (USF Health) researchers found. Mounting studies indicate that the nicotine and other chemicals delivered by vaping, while generally less toxic than conventional cigarettes, can damage the lungs and heart. “But […]

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Early details of brain damage in COVID-19 patients

One of the first spectroscopic imaging-based studies of neurological injury in COVID-19 patients has been reported by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in the American Journal of Neuroradiology. Looking at six patients using a specialized magnetic resonance (MR) technique, they found that COVID-19 patients with neurological symptoms show some of the same metabolic disturbances in the brain as other […]

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COVID-19 could damage the fertility of up to 20% of male survivors

COVID-19 could damage the fertility of up to 20% of male survivors, scientist claims after discovering the virus can linger in the testicles for up to a MONTH Researchers looked at testicles tissue from autopsies of six men who died from COVID-19 infection Three of the men had impaired sperm function with issues such as decreased sperm production One living […]

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The masks lie: Why the Corona protection does not make us sick

“The masks are sick” claim to make some of the Facebook Posts. There are, however, no scientific evidence. Quite to the contrary. Masks to protect ourselves and especially others from the Coronavirus. Do not weaken our immune system. It took a while, but in the meantime, the health experts of the world health organization (WHO), the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) and the […]

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MRI-identified damage tied to patient-reported RA function

(HealthDay)—There is a consistent association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of damage in the wrist and hand and self-reported loss of function in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in sustained clinical remission, according to a study recently published in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases. Daniel Glinatsi, M.D., Ph.D., from the Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research at Rigshospitalet […]

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Two enzymes control liver damage in NASH, study shows

As much as 12 percent of adults in the United States are living with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), an aggressive condition that can lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer. After identifying a molecular pathway that allows NASH to progress into liver cell death, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers were able to halt further liver damage in mouse […]

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New clues found to help protect heart from damage after heart attack

Studying mice, scientists have shown that boosting the activity of specific immune cells in the heart after a heart attack can protect against developing heart failure, an invariably fatal condition. Patients with heart failure tire easily and become breathless from everyday activities because the heart muscle has lost the ability to pump enough blood to the body. The study, by […]

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Lenalidomide may delay onset of myeloma-related bone, organ damage

The largest randomized trial in asymptomatic patients with smoldering multiple myeloma suggests that lenalidomide, a cancer drug, may delay the onset of bone and other myeloma-related organ damage. Results of the study, which was conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and funded by the National Cancer Institute, were published Friday, Oct. 25, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. “Our […]

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Vitamin E found to prevent muscle damage after heart attack

Heart attack is a leading cause of death worldwide and new treatment strategies are highly sought-after. Unfortunately lasting damage to the heart muscle is not uncommon following such an event. Published in Redox Biology, the pre-clinical study sheds new light on the potential of the acute therapy with α-TOH (vitamin E) in patients presenting with heart attack, and may ultimately […]

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Cell-free DNA detects pathogens and quantifies damage

A common problem in diagnosing infectious disease is that the presence of a potential pathogen in the body does not necessarily mean the patient is sick. This can be particularly challenging for the treatment of organ transplant recipients, who often grapple with infection as well as complications related to immunosuppression. A new Cornell study, “A Cell-Free DNA Metagenomic Sequencing Assay […]

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