Study finds fatty acid that kills cancer cells

Researchers have demonstrated that a fatty acid called dihomogamma-linolenic acid, or DGLA, can kill human cancer cells. The study, published in Developmental Cell on July 10, found that DGLA can induce ferroptosis in an animal model and in actual human cancer cells. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent type of cell death that was discovered in recent years and has become a […]

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Brain cells can harbor and spread HIV virus to the body

Researchers have found that astrocytes, a type of brain cell can harbor HIV and then spread the virus to immune cells that traffic out of the brain and into other organs. HIV moved from the brain via this route even when the virus was suppressed by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), a standard treatment for HIV. The study, conducted by researchers […]

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Scientists modify CAR-T cells to target multiple sites on leukemia cells

In a new pre-clinical study published this week in the journal Leukemia, the research team of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles investigator Hisham Abdel-Azim, MD, MS, worked with colleagues to engineer T-cells to identify and target multiple sites on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells instead of just one. The early collaboration points the way to future clinical trials to test the therapy. […]

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Finding the weak points of cancer cells

The key to effective cures for cancers is to find weak points of cancer cells that are not found in non-cancer cells. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science found that cancerous and non-cancerous cells depend on different factors for survival when their DNA replication is blocked. Drugs that inhibited the survival factor required by cancer cells would […]

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New discovery on the activity and function of MAIT cells during acute HIV infection

In a new study published in Nature Communications, researchers at Karolinska Institutet show that mucosa-associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells) of the human immune system respond with dynamic activity and reprogramming of gene expression during the initial phase of HIV infection. The study fills a knowledge gap, as previously, the function of MAIT cells during this particular phase was not […]

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How dying cells prevent dangerous immune reactions

Dying cells in the body can keep the immune system in check, thus preventing unwanted immune responses against the body’s own tissues. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center have now identified a receptor on murine immune cells that activates this protective mechanism and can thus prevent dangerous autoimmune reactions in which the immune system attacks the patient’s own body […]

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Betrayed by bile: bile acids help norovirus sneak into cells

A new study led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals that human noroviruses, the leading viral cause of foodborne illness and acute diarrhea around the world, infect cells of the small intestine by piggybacking on a normal cellular process called endocytosis that cells use to acquire materials […]

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New Insights: Armies of strategically stationed T cells fight viral infections, cancer

The immune system mounts robust responses to infections, vaccines and cancer, but only now have scientists fully begun to unravel how non-circulating populations of T cells that reside in the body’s “mucosal barrier tissues” keeps threats at bay. While an academic focus on non-circulating T cells in mucosal tissues may seem like an arcane area of research, it is the […]

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Mechanisms help pancreatic cancer cells avert starvation

A new study reveals the mechanism that helps pancreatic cancer cells avoid starvation within dense tumors by hijacking a process that pulls nutrients in from their surroundings. Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the study explains how changes in the gene RAS—known to encourage the abnormal growth seen in 90 percent of pancreatic cancer patients—also accelerate a […]

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Cells study helping to crack the code to Alzheimer’s disease

A study led by researchers at Monash University has opened up new hope for diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia in older people and, as there are no effective treatments, is one of the leading contributors to the global disease burden. Various genes have been implicated in the changes that happen in […]

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