Sleeper cells: Newly discovered stem cell resting phase could put brain tumors to sleep

Christopher Plaisier, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University, and Samantha O’Connor, a biomedical engineering doctoral student in the Plaisier Lab, are leading research into a new stage of the stem cell life cycle that could be the key to unlocking new methods of brain cancer treatment. Their work […]

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When cancer cells ‘put all their eggs in one basket’

Normal cells usually have multiple solutions for fixing problems. For example, when DNA becomes damaged, healthy white blood cells can use several different strategies to make repairs. But cancer cells may “put all their eggs in one basket,” getting rid of all backup plans and depending on just one pathway to mend their DNA. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Professor […]

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New cells harnessed to ambush and kill malaria immediately upon transmission

A change in the plan of attack against malaria—to target the infection as soon as it enters the bloodstream—has yielded exciting results for Burnet Institute scientists seeking to accelerate the development of a highly protective malaria vaccine. For decades global malaria vaccine research has focused overwhelmingly on immune responses that may block malaria from infecting liver cells, an essential stage […]

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We’ve smuggled tiny diamonds into cells to shine light on the development of cancer

Over the years, scientists have put together an amazing array of microscopic markers that they can place within cells whenever they need to label and observe distinct parts of a cell’s interior. Such labeling is used for a wide array of research, including cancer research. But sneaking these markers into cells, through the membrane that protects them from unwanted substances, […]

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Researchers identify immune cells that contribute to transplant rejection

Non-circulating memory T cells, whose main function is to provide local protection against re-infection, contribute to chronic transplant rejection, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers reveal in a paper published today in Science Immunology. The scientists show that these “tissue-resident memory T cells” are harmful in situations where antigens that the cells recognize are present in the body for […]

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Chemical cocktail creates new avenues for generating muscle stem cells

A UCLA-led research team has identified a chemical cocktail that enables the production of large numbers of muscle stem cells, which can self-renew and give rise to all types of skeletal muscle cells. The advance could lead to the development of stem cell-based therapies for muscle loss or damage due to injury, age or disease. The research was published in […]

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SARS-CoV-2 hijacks two key metabolic pathways to rapidly replicate in host cells

When SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, infects a human cell, it quickly begins to replicate by seizing the cell’s existing metabolic machinery. The infected cells churn out thousands of viral genomes and proteins while halting the production of their own resources. Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), and the Broad Institute, studying cultured cells shortly […]

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Study finds cancer cells may evade chemotherapy by going dormant

Cancer cells can dodge chemotherapy by entering a state that bears similarity to certain kinds of senescence, a type of “active hibernation” that enables them to weather the stress induced by aggressive treatments aimed at destroying them, according to a new study by scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine. These findings have implications for developing new drug combinations that could block […]

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Release of serotonin from mast cells contribute to airway hyperresposivness in asthma

In asthma, the airways become hyperresponsive. Researchers from Uppsala University have found a new mechanism that contributes to, and explains, airway hyperresponsiveness. The results are published in the scientific journal Allergy. Some 10 percent of Sweden’s population suffer from asthma. In asthmatics, the airways are hyperresponsive (overreactive) to various types of stimuli, such as cold air, physical exertion and chemicals. […]

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Natural product isolated from sea sponge tested against cancer cells

Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) together with Russian and German colleagues, continue studying antitumor compounds synthesized based on bioactive molecules isolated from a sea sponge. One of them fights cancer cells resistant to standard chemotherapy, and at the same time has an interesting dual mechanism of action. A related article appears in Marine Drugs. Scientists have tested the […]

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