Experimental medication to prevent heart disease may treat chemo-resistant ovarian cancer

Most ovarian cancer starts in fallopian tubes. Then it sloughs from its site of origin and floats around in fluid until finding new sites of attachment. It’s not easy for cancer cells to survive away from their moorings. Observations by ovarian cancer doctors at University of Colorado Cancer Center and elsewhere hint at how they might do it: These doctors […]

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Women’s wellness: Sexual health after cancer treatment

Following a cancer diagnosis, patients often ask many questions about their treatment and possible side effects. One area that is often overlooked is sexual health, which experts say is important to talk about to ensure quality of life. Dr. Jacqueline Thielen, a Mayo Clinic general internal medicine physician, says it’s normal for patients to experience changes during and after cancer […]

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Finding the weak points of cancer cells

The key to effective cures for cancers is to find weak points of cancer cells that are not found in non-cancer cells. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science found that cancerous and non-cancerous cells depend on different factors for survival when their DNA replication is blocked. Drugs that inhibited the survival factor required by cancer cells would […]

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Brain cancer research could help dogs—and the humans who love them

Few heartbreaks are as devastating as when a beloved family dog falls ill with cancer. But a new research paper could spur development of more and better treatments for a canine companion who has a brain tumor—because it’s possible that those same therapies will help human kids, too. Dogs’ brain cancers are genetically akin to those found in children, a […]

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One’s internal clock could be targeted to prevent or slow the progression of breast cancer

City of Hope scientists have identified an unlikely way to potentially prevent or slow the progression of aggressive breast cancer: target one’s internal clock. Often taken for granted, the circadian rhythm is gaining traction as a potential catalyst or brake for the onset of disease. For example, studies have shown that women who take frequent night shifts have disrupted internal […]

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New insight into immune cell behavior offers opportunities for cancer treatment

An international group of scientists has discovered that certain cells of our immune system—the so-called T cells—communicate with each other and work together as a team. To fight an infection they stimulate each other’s growth, but at the same time, they inhibit each other when there is a surplus of T cells. That insight offers new opportunities for the treatment […]

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'Terminal cancer diagnosis made me feel nothing but gratitude for life I've had'

Doreen was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer four years ago – there is no cure. The cancer had already spread to Doreen’s brain by the time it was detected, but the 70-year-old has taken the diagnosis in her stride, literally. A passionate long-distance walker, Doreen feels grateful that she is still able to keep active and says that walking […]

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Study examines genetic testing in diverse young breast cancer patients over a decade

Breast cancer patients diagnosed under age 50 represent 18 percent of new invasive breast cancer cases in the United States. Compared to postmenopausal women, younger women are more likely to develop aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, have a worse prognosis with increased risk of recurrence, and have higher overall mortality. Young breast cancer patients also are more likely to be […]

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