Can kids be harmed wearing masks to protect against COVID? – The Denver Post

Can kids be harmed wearing masks to protect against COVID? No, there is no scientific evidence showing masks cause harm to kids’ health despite baseless claims suggesting otherwise. The claims are circulating on social media and elsewhere just as virus outbreaks are hitting many reopened U.S. schools — particularly those without mask mandates. Among the unfounded arguments: Masks can foster […]

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Married patients experience better outcomes following total joint arthroplasty with increased psychosocial support

A recent study, “Effect of Marital Status on Outcomes Following Total Joint Arthroplasty,” looked at contributing factors toward the best and safest environment for a patient to recuperate following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA). The study, presented at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), found that, overall, married patients or […]

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The Biden administration is being criticized for falling short on its pledge to provide vaccines to the world.

President Biden, who has pledged to fight the coronavirus pandemic by making the United States the “arsenal of vaccines” for the world, is under increasing criticism from public health experts, global health advocates and even Democrats in Congress who say he is nowhere near fulfilling his promise. Mr. Biden has either donated or pledged about 600 million vaccine doses to […]

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Psychological capital may be the antidote for working in a pandemic, study suggests

Just like the COVID-19 vaccine protects against contracting the contagious virus, the collective elements of self-efficacy, optimism, hope and resiliency help inoculate employees from the negative effects of working through a pandemic, according to a new West Virginia University study. Jeffery Houghton, management professor, had studied how college students coped with stress through adaptive (i.e. exercise, meditation, social networking) and […]

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Hepatitis C vaccine could be rolled out within five years, says Nobel Prize winner who discovered virus

A vaccine to protect against infection with hepatitis C could be in use within 5 years, says Professor Sir Michael Houghton, who won the Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology along with three other scientists for discovering the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989. Sir Michael will discuss the development of a vaccine in a special presentation at this year’s […]

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How social media could be affecting COVID vaccine hesitancy

A social media campaign could help to advertise the positives of COVID-19 vaccination and counter the negative posts and comments which are putting Australia’s vaccination program at risk, a UNSW researcher says. ARC Discovery Early Career Research Fellow in UNSW Science’s School of Psychology, Dr. Kate Faasse says social media is exaggerating COVID vaccine side effects and is playing a […]

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Researcher investigates the behavior and life cycle of most infectious pathogenic bacteria

Although it is not spread through human contact, Francisella tularensis is one of the most infectious pathogenic bacteria known to science–so virulent, in fact, that it is considered a serious potential bioterrorist threat. It is thought that humans can contract respiratory tularemia, or rabbit fever–a rare and deadly disease–by inhaling as few as 10 airborne organisms. Northern Arizona University professor […]

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Sexual receptivity and rejection may be orchestrated by the same brain region

In many species, including humans and mice, the fluctuating levels of the hormones progesterone and estrogen determine whether the female is fertile or not. And in the case of mice, whether she’s sexually receptive or not. The change in receptivity is striking. Female mice shift from accepting sexual partners to aggressively rejecting them across a cycle of six short days. […]

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