Mouth bacteria may explain why some kids hate broccoli

When confronted with the tiniest forkful of cauliflower or broccoli, some kids can’t help but scrunch up their faces in disgust. But don’t blame them — a new study hints that specific enzymes in spit might make cruciferous vegetables taste particularly vile to some children. These enzymes, called cysteine lyases, are produced by different kinds of bacteria that live in […]

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Fungi and bacteria in the gut may equally impact human health and disease severity

The gut microbiome has received a lot of attention, but new research shows that fungi in the gut are also an important microorganism in gut functioning and health, which then affects human health. Gut Health. Image Credit: metamorworks/Shutterstock.com Contrasting effects of fungal communities in the gut In recent years, the role of microbial diversity and richness in the gut has […]

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Enzyme inhibitor boosts immune system to fight MRSA and other dangerous skin infections

In what turned out to be one of the most important accidents of all time, Scottish bacteriologist Alexander Fleming returned to his laboratory after a vacation in 1928 to find a clear zone surrounding a piece of mold that had infiltrated a petri dish full of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a common skin bacterium he was growing. That region of […]

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Researchers explore potential exposure to microbial agents in-utero

The human fetal immune system begins to develop early during gestation, however, factors responsible for fetal immune-priming remain elusive. Using multiple complementary approaches, Dr Florent Ginhoux from A*STAR's Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), Professor Jerry Chan from KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH), Professor Salvatore Albani from the SingHealth Duke-NUS Translational Immunology Institute, with collaborators from Cambridge University explored potential exposure […]

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Stop Kissing and Snuggling Chickens, C.D.C. Says After Salmonella Outbreak

A salmonella outbreak linked to backyard poultry has prompted U.S. health officials to issue a stern warning: Don’t kiss or snuggle your ducks and chickens. There have been 163 illnesses and 34 hospitalizations reported across 43 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said last week. North Carolina had the most reported cases, with 13, followed by Iowa, with […]

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Developing nanoparticles to detect and kill multi-resistant pathogens

Multi-resistant pathogens are a serious and increasing problem in today's medicine. Where antibiotics are ineffective, these bacteria can cause life-threatening infections. Researchers at Empa and ETH Zurich are currently developing nanoparticles that can be used to detect and kill multi-resistant pathogens that hide inside our body cells. The team published the study in the current issue of the journal Nanoscale. […]

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Oral Microbiome Linked to COVID-19 Diagnosis

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Oral microbial markers may be a potential diagnostic tool for COVID-19, researchers suggest. As reported in Gut, Dr. Lanjuan Li of Zhengzhou University in China and colleagues sequenced 392 tongue-coating samples, 172 fecal and 155 serum samples from Central and East China. They characterized the microbiome and lipid molecules, then constructed microbial classifiers in a […]

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Scientists optimize wastewater disinfection process to minimize spread of antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have become a global threat today, owing in part to the efficiency with which resistance spreads among them. Some of this spread happens in waterbodies—and our wastewater systems are no exception. A group of scientists from Korea and the US has now conducted some of the groundwork needed to optimize disinfection processes and minimize the spread of antibiotic […]

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UTI Vaccine in Development Shows Promise

Although it’s still in development, a vaccine against current and future urinary tract infections could also wipe out other problems, such as women being given the wrong antibiotic or given antibiotics for too long, a pair of newly released studies say. For the first time, researchers at Duke University Medical Center designed a vaccine that could more completely treat urinary […]

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Researchers explore early stages of ribosome formation to identify new targets for antibiotics

Ribosome formation is viewed as a promising potential target for new antibacterial agents. Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have gained new insights into this multifaceted process. The formation of ribosomal components involves multiple helper proteins which, much like instruments in an orchestra, interact in a coordinated way. One of these helper proteins – protein ObgE – acts as the […]

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