Study: Spanking May Change Children’s Brains

Rare is the parent who’s never so much as thought about spanking an unruly child. But a new study provides another reason to avoid corporal punishment: Spanking may cause changes in the same areas of a child’s brain affected by more severe physical and sexual abuse. Previous research has consistently found links between spanking and behavioral problems, aggression, depression, and […]

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Men with fragile masculinity more likely to show aggression

‘Fragile masculinity refers to anxiety felt by men who believe they are falling short of cultural standards of manhood.’ Not only does this affect the mental health of men who aren’t secure in their masculinity, this piece of research states that it may also make men act out aggressively towards others. Two studies by Duke University researchers looked at 195 students […]

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Researchers probe how aggression leads to more aggression

Like a champion fighter gaining confidence after each win, a male mouse that prevails in several successive aggressive encounters against other male mice will become even more aggressive in future encounters, attacking faster and for longer and ignoring submission signals from his opponent. This phenomenon is interesting to people who study the neuroscience of behavior, because aggression is an innate, […]

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Testosterone and cortisol modulate the effects of empathy on aggression in children

Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have explored the psychobiological mechanisms that may exist behind aggressive behaviour in children. The study, which included 139 eight-year-old children, has concluded that low levels of testosterone and high levels of empathy may explain the low levels of aggressive behaviour in girls; low levels of empathy and high levels of cortisol may […]

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Sex and aggression in mice controlled by cold-sensor in brain

Testosterone is blamed for sex drive and aggression, but it also appears to be critical for telling the brain “enough!” when it comes to those behaviors. A molecule called TRPM8 (pronounced trip-M-8) embedded in the surface of some cells seems to be responsible for sending these cues in response to testosterone. Without these cues, male mice become dangerously aggressive and […]

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