Blood flow monitor could save lives: Fibre-optic probe gives continuous cardiac measure

A tiny fibre-optic sensor has the potential to save lives in open heart surgery, and even during surgery on pre-term babies. The new micro-medical device could surpass traditional methods used to monitor blood flow through the aorta during prolonged and often dangerous intensive care and surgical procedures — even in the tiniest of patients. The continuous cardiac flow monitoring probe, […]

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People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices

The lives of thousands of people with mobility issues could be transformed thanks to ground-breaking research by scientists at the University of Bristol. The FREEHAB project will develop soft, wearable rehabilitative devices with a view to helping elderly and disabled people walk and move from sitting to a standing position in comfort and safety. Led by University of Bristol Professor […]

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Wearable sensors mimic skin to help with wound healing process

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York, have developed skin-inspired electronics to conform to the skin, allowing for long-term, high-performance, real-time wound monitoring in users. “We eventually hope that these sensors and engineering accomplishments can help advance healthcare applications and provide a better quantitative understanding in disease progression, wound care, general health, fitness monitoring and more,” said Matthew […]

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Electronic ‘word of mouth’ useful in detecting, predicting fashion trends

 Ever stare at your closet and wonder why fashion designers aren’t creating the clothes you really want? Talking about it on social media might just be the answer. According to new research from the University of Missouri, social media hashtags could be the tool fashion designers use to forecast trends in the industry to better connect with consumers. Data analytics […]

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New robotic sensor technology can diagnose reproductive health problems in real-time

The technology, developed by researchers at Imperial College London and The University of Hong Kong, can be used to measure hormones that affect fertility, sexual development and menstruation more quickly and cheaply than current methods. The work, published in Nature Communications, took place in the Chemistry Department at Imperial College London and the School of Biomedical Sciences at the University […]

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Materials chemists tap body heat to power ‘smart garments’

Many wearable biosensors, data transmitters and similar tech advances for personalized health monitoring have now been “creatively miniaturized,” says materials chemist Trisha Andrew at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, but they require a lot of energy, and power sources can be bulky and heavy. Now she and her Ph.D. student Linden Allison report that they have developed a fabric that […]

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