New research suggests proton radiation can benefit pts with challenging liver tumors

Two new studies support and inform the use of proton radiation therapy to treat patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a common but often fatal type of liver cancer for which there are limited treatment options. One study (Sanford et al.) suggests that proton radiation, compared to traditional photon radiation, can extend overall survival with reduced toxicity. A second study (Hsieh […]

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Therapy for neuroendocrine tumors may be improved by patient-specific dosimetry

In neuroendocrine tumor treatment, different methods of predicting patient response may be required for different patients, according to new research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. By tailoring the method to the specific patient, physicians may better predict the effectiveness of treatment. “The present study aimed to develop a method for patient-specific determination of activity […]

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A new approach to targeting tumors and tracking their spread

The spread of malignant cells from an original tumor to other parts of the body, known as metastasis, is the main cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Early detection of tumors and metastases could significantly improve cancer survival rates. However, predicting exactly when cancer cells will break away from the original tumor, and where in the body they will form new […]

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Antibody therapy training phagocytes to destroy tumors now tested on patients

Developed by researchers at the University of Turku in Finland, an immunotherapeutic antibody therapy re-educates macrophages to activate passivated cytotoxic T cells to kill cancer. The antibody therapy prevented the growth of tumours in several mouse models, and the development of the therapy has now progressed to patient testing in a phase I/II clinical trial. One reason behind many unsuccessful […]

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Decrease in specific gene ‘silencing’ molecules linked with pediatric brain tumors

Experimenting with lab-grown brain cancer cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a shortage of specific tiny molecules that silence certain genes is linked to the development and growth of pediatric brain tumors known as low-grade gliomas. A report of the findings was published this fall 2018 in Scientific Reports, and supports the idea of increasing levels […]

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