Mutual appreciation key to saving marriage after a stroke, study shows

Laurel Sproule knew something in her 18-year marriage was changing when she came into the kitchen and found her husband Fred just standing there. He’d suffered a recent heart attack and then a stroke, but was home, and slowly responding to therapy. Getting ready to go out one day, they needed to eat lunch first, so Laurel laid out sandwich […]

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Study reveals how much fiber we should eat to prevent disease

Researchers and public health organizations have long hailed the benefits of eating fiber, but how much fiber should we consume, exactly? This question has prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to commission a new study. The results appear in the journal The Lancet. The new research aimed to help develop new guidelines for dietary fiber consumption, as well as reveal […]

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Algorithm Evaluates Cervical Images to ID Precancer, Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 — A deep learning-based visual evaluation algorithm can detect cervical precancer/cancer with higher accuracy than conventional cytology, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Liming Hu, Ph.D., from the Intellectual Ventures Global Good Fund in Bellevue, Washington, and colleagues followed a population-based longitudinal cohort of 9,406 women […]

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Recurrent miscarriage linked to faulty sperm

The early-stage study, from scientists at Imperial College London, investigated the sperm quality of 50 men whose partners had suffered three or more consecutive miscarriages. The research, published in the journal Clinical Chemistry, revealed that, compared to men whose partners had not experienced miscarriages, the sperm of those involved in the study had higher levels of DNA damage. The study […]

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Study: Technology and doctors combine to detect patients who don’t take their pills

Almost everyone does it at some point—skip a dose of a medication, decide to not schedule a recommended follow-up appointment or ignore doctor’s orders to eat or exercise differently. Such nonadherence can seem harmless on an individual level, but costs the U.S. health care system billions of dollars a year. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown how to best identify […]

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Pediatric Mortality Rate From Opioid Poisoning Rose 1999 to 2016

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 — From 1999 to 2016, there was close to a threefold increase in the pediatric mortality rate from opioid poisonings in the United States, according to a study published online Dec. 28 in JAMA Network Open. Julie R. Gaither, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.N., from the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and colleagues examined national […]

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Emotional Hangovers Are a Real Thing — Here's How to Cure Them

Many of us (unfortunately) know what a hangover is and have experienced one. After a long night of drinking, we wake up feeling sluggish, dizzy and nauseated and have a sensitivity to light or sound. But it’s not just alcohol that can make you feel awful the next day — emotions can have the same effect. So what is an emotional […]

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Rich people found to be more charitable if given a sense of control

A pair of researchers, one with Harvard Business School, the other with the University of British Columbia, found that when soliciting donations from wealthy people, it pays to offer them a sense of control. In their paper published on the open access site PLOS ONE, Ashley Whillans and Elizabeth Dunn describe their study, which involved sending donation request letters to […]

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