Health research funding lags for Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders

Clinical research funding continues to lag for the U.S. population of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, even though the nation’s largest biomedical funding agency has pledged to prioritize research on diverse populations, a new study from Oregon State University shows. “We looked at how this commitment has translated to funding and we found that things really haven’t changed,” […]

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New cars are safer, but women most likely to suffer injury

Cars built in the last decade have been shown to be safer than older models, including in the most common types of crashes — frontal collisions. However, a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Virginia’s Center for Applied Biomechanics shows that women wearing seat belts are significantly more likely to suffer injury than their male counterparts. Belted […]

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Migraine increases the risk of complications during pregnancy and childbirth

Despite the fact that many women who suffer migraines find that the number and severity of these severe headaches decrease during pregnancy, migraines are now being linked to elevated blood pressure, abortions, caesareans, preterm births and babies with low birth weight. This is documented by an extensive register-based study recently published in the scientific journal Headache and carried out at […]

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Body composition shown to affect energy spent standing versus sitting: Findings support increased standing time as a simple way to boost energy expenditure

A person’s body composition could influence the difference between the amount of energy they spend while sitting versus standing, according to new research published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. Conducted by Francisco J. Amaro-Gahete of the University of Granada, Spain, and colleagues, this work adds to mounting evidence that more energy is expended while standing than while sitting or […]

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Physical activity in preschool years can affect future heart health

Physical activity in early childhood may have an impact on cardiovascular health later in life, according to new research from McMaster University, where scientists followed the activity levels of hundreds of preschoolers over a period of years. They found that physical activity in children as young as three years old benefits blood vessel health, cardiovascular fitness and is key to […]

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Young athletes may need one-year break after knee surgery

After surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, young athletes are now recommended to undergo at least a year’s rehab and thorough testing before resuming knee-strenuous sport. Research shows that those who return to sport relatively soon after surgery incur a highly elevated risk of a second ACL injury. “What’s absolutely essential is to let the rehab take time. Every […]

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Home-schoolers see no added health risks over time: Better sleep, diet habits help counter shortfalls in formal exercise

Years of home-schooling don’t appear to influence the general health of children, according to a Rice University study. A report by Rice kinesiology lecturer Laura Kabiri and colleagues in the Oxford University Press journal Health Promotion International puts forth evidence that the amount of time a student spends in home school is “weakly or not at all related to multiple […]

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Stillbirth threefold increase when sleeping on back in pregnancy

Research spearheaded by a University of Huddersfield lecturer has shown that pregnant women can lower the risk of stillbirth by sleeping on their side and NOT on their back. Now the finding forms part of official NHS guidance designed to bring about reductions in the number of babies who are stillborn in the UK — amounting to nine a day, […]

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Ageism linked to poorer health in older people in England

Ageism may be linked with poorer health in older people in England, according to an observational study of over 7,500 people aged over 50 published in The Lancet Public Health journal. Despite the known prevalence of age discrimination and existing evidence that other forms of discrimination, like racism, are linked to poorer health, this is the first study to examine […]

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Study reveals that night and weekend births have substantially higher risk of delivery complications

As if expecting mothers didn’t have enough to worry about, a new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal found that the quantity of delivery complications in hospitals are substantially higher during nights, weekends and holidays, and in teaching hospitals. Each year, nearly four million women give birth in U.S. hospitals, making childbirth the most common cause of hospitalization […]

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