Study finds higher risk of stroke-linked plaque in men, possible test for women

Men are more likely than women to develop unstable plaques in their neck arteries, a dangerous condition that can lead to strokes, according to new research that also identified a helpful warning sign for rupture-prone plaques in women. The preliminary study, presented Thursday at the American Heart Association’s Vascular Discovery Scientific Sessions, sought to identify sex-specific markers of plaque instability […]

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Study highlights importance of healthy lifestyle during menopause

Australian research has further debunked the myth that people gain weight during menopause, adding to existing opinion that there is instead a redistribution of weight during this period. According to research from the Australian National University, published in American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology this month, while women do gain weight as they age, it is not attributable to the […]

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Psychological abuse is most common form of maltreatment experienced by national team athletes, study finds

The most common form of maltreatment experienced by athletes is psychological abuse, followed by neglect, a new study from the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education has found. The findings are the result of a survey to determine the prevalence of maltreatment among current and former national team athletes, conducted in partnership with AthletesCan and with support […]

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Study shows that artificial neural networks can be used to drive brain activity

MIT neuroscientists have performed the most rigorous testing yet of computational models that mimic the brain’s visual cortex. Using their current best model of the brain’s visual neural network, the researchers designed a new way to precisely control individual neurons and populations of neurons in the middle of that network. In an animal study, the team then showed that the […]

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Doctors underestimate patients’ weight loss attempts: study

Doctors think people with obesity are much less interested in losing weight than they actually are, an Australian-led study has found. According research presented at the European Congress on Obesity on Monday, 71 per cent of health professionals believe people with obesity do not want to lose weight, although only 7 per cent of people with obesity said they felt […]

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Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing, study shows

Research has shown that people who are born blind or become blind early in life often have a more nuanced sense of hearing, especially when it comes to musical abilities and tracking moving objects in space (imagine crossing a busy road using sound alone). For decades scientists have wondered what changes in the brain might underlie these enhanced auditory abilities. […]

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Type-2 diabetes: Eating this one fruit could help lower blood sugar levels

According to the NHS, type-2 diabetes is a common condition that causes the level of sugar in the blood to increase. Many people have the condition without realising because symptoms aren’t always clear, but extreme weight loss and thirst are signs. Luckily for sufferers, there are plenty of ways to reduce blood sugar levels. While most patients need medication to […]

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Asian nations in early tobacco epidemic: study

Asian countries are in the early stages of a tobacco smoking epidemic with habits mirroring those of the United States from past decades, setting the stage for a spike in future deaths from smoking-related diseases. That’s the conclusion of researchers from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center after analyzing 20 prospective cohort studies from mainland China, Japan, South […]

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Study suggests college students end up in vicious cycle of substance abuse, poor academics, stress

One negative behavior such as substance abuse or heavy alcohol drinking can lead college students toward a vicious cycle of poor lifestyle choices, lack of sleep, mental distress and low grades, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. “We used a robust data-mining technique to identify associations between mental distress in college students with substance […]

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For busy medical students, two-hour meditation study may be as beneficial as longer course

For time-crunched medical students, taking a two-hour introductory class on mindfulness may be just as beneficial for reducing stress and depression as taking an eight-week meditation course, a Rutgers study finds. The study, conducted by researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, is published in the journal Medical Science Educator. The researchers say many medical students would like to […]

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