How bosses react influences whether workers speak up

Speaking up in front of a supervisor can be stressful — but it doesn’t have to be, according to new research from a Rice University psychologist. How a leader responds to employee suggestions can impact whether or not the employee opens up in the future. Danielle King, an assistant professor of psychology at Rice, is the lead author of “Voice […]

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Seeing disfigured faces prompts negative brain and behavior responses: Brain imaging study finds negative implicit biases against individuals with scars, birthmarks and other facial differences

People with attractive faces are often seen as more trustworthy, socially competent, better adjusted, and more capable in school and work. The correlation of attractiveness and positive character traits leads to a “beautiful is good” stereotype. However, little has been understood about the behavioral and neural responses to those with facial abnormalities, such as scars, skin cancers, birthmarks, and other […]

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Marching for climate change may sway people’s beliefs and actions

Americans have a long tradition of taking to the streets to protest or to advocate for things they believe in. New research suggests that when it comes to climate change, these marches may indeed have a positive effect on the public. A team including Penn State researchers found that people tended to be more optimistic about people’s ability to work […]

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Exaggerated physical differences between male and female superheroes

Superheroes like Thor and Black Widow may have what it takes to save the world in movies like Avengers: Endgame, but neither of their comic book depictions has a healthy body mass index (BMI). New research from Binghamton University and SUNY Oswego found that, within the pages of comic books, male superheroes are on average obese, while females are on […]

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How humans reduce uncertainty in social situations: Scientists propose a psychological model of three interrelated ways people reduce uncertainty in social situations

Do my friends find me funny? Am I making a good impression during this job interview? For most, such questions and concerns are a routine part of life. A new perspective paper from Brown University scientists establishes a framework to apply rigorous mathematical models of uncertainty originally developed for non-social situations, such as whether or not to purchase a lottery […]

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Empathy often avoided because of mental effort: People don’t want to feel empathy unless they think they are good at it, study finds

Even when feeling empathy for others isn’t financially costly or emotionally draining, people will still avoid it because they think empathy requires too much mental effort, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. Empathy, the ability to understand the feelings of another person, is often viewed as a virtue that encourages helping behaviors. But people often don’t […]

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Mobile devices don’t reduce shared family time: New research shows that mobile device use is now embedded into family life

The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less — but not in shared activities such as watching tv and eating. The increase is in what is called ‘alone-together’ time, when children are at […]

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Proofs of parallel evolution between cognition, tool development, and social complexity: A study analyses the selective attention processes that determine how we explore and interact with our environment

Researchers examined the visual response of 113 individuals when observing prehistoric ceramics belonging to different styles and societies. The ceramics analysed cover 4,000 years (from 4000 B.C. to the change of era) of Galician prehistory (north-west Iberia), and are representative of ceramic styles, such as bell-beaker pottery, found throughout Europe. The results indicate that the visual behaviour follows the same […]

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What makes people willing to sacrifice their own self-interest for another person? Study’s findings may have troubling implications for ethical behavior

In a new Northwestern University study, researchers show that people are more willing to sacrifice for a collaborator than for someone working just as hard but working independently. “This suggests we’re more likely to share our resources with others when we feel like our lives and work are interdependent with the lives and work of those other people,” said lead […]

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Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role

People fall in love for many reasons — similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. But if they marry and stay together, their long-term happiness may depend on their individual genes or those of their spouse, says a new study led by Yale School of Public Health researchers. Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the study examined the […]

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