Persistent Opioid Use High in Head, Neck Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 — Persistent opioid use at three and six months remains high among patients undergoing treatment for head and neck squamous cell cancer, according to a study recently published in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Jessica D. McDermott, M.D., from the University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine in Aurora, and colleagues used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology […]

Read more

Study: Technology and doctors combine to detect patients who don’t take their pills

Almost everyone does it at some point—skip a dose of a medication, decide to not schedule a recommended follow-up appointment or ignore doctor’s orders to eat or exercise differently. Such nonadherence can seem harmless on an individual level, but costs the U.S. health care system billions of dollars a year. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown how to best identify […]

Read more

Role of PCSK9 inhibitors in high risk patients with dyslipidemia

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder which is characterized by substantially increased Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Timely reduction of LDL-C is of paramount importance to ameliorate the risk for CV disease as patients with FH have a significantly higher risk for Cardiovascular (CV) events. Pro-protein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors have emerged as a very […]

Read more

After naloxone, when can opioid overdose patients be safely discharged?

Naloxone has saved thousands of lives. But can patients be safely discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) just an hour after they receive the medication that curtails drug overdoses? According to the St. Paul’s Early Discharge Rule developed in 2000, that’s how long providers should observe patients after naloxone treatment, so long as their vital signs meet specific criteria and […]

Read more

Edging closer to personalized medicine for patients with irregular heartbeat

In 2015, then President Barack Obama launched a precision medicine initiative, saying that its promise was “delivering the right treatments, at the right time, every time to the right person.” A biomedical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis has answered the call by making a significant step toward precision medicine for patients with a life-threatening form of irregular heartbeat […]

Read more

MRI effective for monitoring liver fat in obese patients

MRI provides a safe, noninvasive way to monitor liver fat levels in people who undergo weight loss treatments for obesity, according to a new study published in the journal Radiology. Obesity is a major U.S. public health issue, with more than two-thirds of American adults considered overweight or obese. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is common in obese patients. The condition […]

Read more

New jab may be a game changer for prostate cancer patients

New jab may be a game changer for thousands of prostate cancer patients Scientists at King’s College London invent new jab to fight prostate cancer cells They will create a man-made version of a naturally occurring protein called IL-15 They aim to start a trial involving 20 men with advanced prostate cancer at Guy’s Hospital in London next year A […]

Read more

New connected device makes injectable insulin easier to monitor for diabetes type 1 patients

The number of diabetics in the world, both insulin dependent and not insulin dependent, is 415 million and it is expected to grow to 600 million in 2040. If their treatment fails, there is high risk of complications related to vascular and nerve affection and even death. The EU’s INSULCLOCK project is putting forward a solution to help diabetics manage […]

Read more

Delaying adjuvant chemo associated with worse outcomes for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

Patients with triple-negative breast cancer who delayed starting adjuvant chemotherapy for more than 30 days after surgery were at significantly higher risk for disease recurrence and death compared with those who started the treatment in the first 30 days after surgery, according to a retrospective study presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 4-8. “For this […]

Read more

Researchers classify Alzheimer’s patients in six subgroups

Researchers studying Alzheimer’s disease have created an approach to classify patients with Alzheimer’s disease, a finding that may open the door for personalized treatments. “Alzheimer’s, like breast cancer, is not one disease,” said lead author Shubhabrata Mukherjee, research assistant professor in general internal medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine. “I think a good drug might fail in […]

Read more
1 2 3