Taking statins for heart disease cuts risk in half, yet only 6 percent of patients taking as directed

A new study has found that patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease cut their risk of a second major adverse cardiovascular event by almost 50 percent, if they adhere to taking a statin medication as prescribed by their doctors. While that’s good news for patients, the bad news, however, is that researchers from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake […]

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Integrated therapy treating obesity and depression is effective

An intervention combining behavioral weight loss treatment and problem-solving therapy with as-needed antidepressant medication for participants with co-occurring obesity and depression improved weight loss and depressive symptoms compared with routine physician care, according to an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Obesity and depression commonly occur together. Approximately 43 percent of adults with depression are obese, […]

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Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role

People fall in love for many reasons — similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. But if they marry and stay together, their long-term happiness may depend on their individual genes or those of their spouse, says a new study led by Yale School of Public Health researchers. Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the study examined the […]

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How long do people need to be monitored after fainting? Study reveals best ways to catch life-threatening conditions

For the first time, physicians in the Emergency Department (ED) have evidence-based recommendations on how best to catch the life-threatening conditions that make some people faint. New research published in Circulation suggests that low-risk patients can be safely sent home by a physician after spending two hours in the ED, and medium and high-risk patients can be sent home after […]

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Personalized treatment benefits kidney cancer patients

 Personalized treatment plans may extend life expectancy for early-stage kidney cancer patients who have risk factors for worsening kidney disease, according to a new study published in the journal Radiology. Kidney, or renal, tumors are often discovered at an early stage and are frequently treated with partial nephrectomy, a surgical procedure in which the tumor and part of the kidney […]

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After naloxone, when can opioid overdose patients be safely discharged? Study confirms one hour rule

  Naloxone has saved thousands of lives. But can patients be safely discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) just an hour after they receive the medication that curtails drug overdoses? According to the St. Paul’s Early Discharge Rule developed in 2000, that’s how long providers should observe patients after naloxone treatment, so long as their vital signs meet specific criteria […]

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Millions of low-risk people with diabetes may be testing their blood sugar too often

For people with Type 2 diabetes, the task of testing their blood sugar with a fingertip prick and a drop of blood on a special strip of paper becomes part of everyday life. But a new study suggests that some of them test more often than they need to. In fact, the research shows, 14 percent of people with Type […]

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Patients with type 1 diabetes missing out on glucose devices

Tens of thousands of UK patients with type 1 diabetes are being denied the potential benefits of flash glucose monitoring devices because of a postcode lottery, an investigation by The BMJ has found. Abbott’s Freestyle Libre is currently the only device available in the UK. But the investigation shows that a year after the device became available, around a quarter […]

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Genetic study clarifies the causes of the most severe heart muscle diseases of children

Cardiac muscle degeneration (cardiomyopathy) is the most common cause of severe cardiac dysfunction and life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias in children. These severe disorders often lead to consideration of heart transplant. However, their actual cause — the genetic basis — has been poorly characterized. A collaborative effort of pediatric cardiologists of Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, led by Docent Tiina […]

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New measure for the wellbeing of populations could replace Human Development Index

IIASA researchers have introduced a new, simple measure for human wellbeing across countries, called the Human Life Indicator (HLI), that takes inequality into account and could replace the commonly used but error-prone Human Development Index (HDI). Measuring the overall wellbeing of populations is crucial for evaluating the success of policies. The Human Life Indicator expresses wellbeing in terms of years […]

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