Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM

A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend. Using data obtained from 44 science courses across multiple institutions — including Cornell, the University of Minnesota, Bethel University and American University in Cairo — a team […]

Read more

Prescribed opioids associated with overdose risk for family members without prescriptions: Case control study finds nearly threefold increase in overdose rates for those on same health insurance plan as person with opioid prescription

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, opioid overdoses were responsible for more than 42,000 deaths in 2016. Access to family members’ drugs may be a strong risk factor for overdose in individuals without their own prescriptions, according to a new study by investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Their findings were published recently in JAMA Internal Medicine. […]

Read more

What we think we know — but might not — pushes us to learn more: New findings challenge the popular assumption that curiosity in general is the prime driver of learning

Spoiler alert if you haven’t watched the “Game of Thrones” season finale. If you think you know the farm animal most closely related to T-Rex, or the American president who inspired the creation of blue jelly beans — but aren’t entirely sure — you’re more likely to bone up on the chicken-dinosaur connection or Ronald Reagan’s predilection for glazed, gel-filled […]

Read more

Unlike men, women’s cognitive performance may improve at higher room temperature

Women’s performance on math and verbal tests is best at higher temperatures, while men perform best on the same tests at lower temperatures, according to a study published May 22, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tom Chang and Agne Kajackaite from the USC Marshall School of Business, Los Angeles, USA, and the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, […]

Read more

What makes people willing to sacrifice their own self-interest for another person? Study’s findings may have troubling implications for ethical behavior

In a new Northwestern University study, researchers show that people are more willing to sacrifice for a collaborator than for someone working just as hard but working independently. “This suggests we’re more likely to share our resources with others when we feel like our lives and work are interdependent with the lives and work of those other people,” said lead […]

Read more

Boys with good motor skills excel at problem-solving, too

Boys with good motor skills are better problem-solvers than their less skilful peers, a new study from Finland shows. In contrast to previous studies, the researchers found no association between aerobic fitness or overweight and obesity with cognitive function in boys. The results are based on the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) Study conducted at the University of […]

Read more

Family, school support makes kids more likely to stand up to bullying

A recent study from North Carolina State University and the University of South Carolina finds that young people with good family relationships are more likely to intervene when they witness bullying or other aggressive behavior at school — and to step in if they see victims planning to retaliate. The study found that kids who were already excluded, or discriminated […]

Read more