Dementia patients’ memories could be RESTORED, study on mice suggests

Dementia patients’ memories could be RESTORED with injection to suppress certain enzymes, study on mice suggests University of Buffalo scientists injecting dementia-stricken rodents with a new drug They saw a ‘dramatic’ shift in the rodents’ recognition memory, spatial memory and working memory Mice with dementia had their memories restored after receiving an injection to suppress a certain enzyme, a new […]

Read more

Teen brain volume changes with small amount of cannabis use, study finds

At a time when several states are moving to legalize recreational use of marijuana, new research shows that concerns about the drug’s impact on teens may be warranted. The study, published in The Journal of Neuroscience, shows that even a small amount of cannabis use by teenagers is linked to differences in their brains. Senior author and University of Vermont […]

Read more

Can We Really Inherit Trauma?

In mid-October, researchers in California published a study of Civil War prisoners that came to a remarkable conclusion. Male children of abused war prisoners were about 10 percent more likely to die than their peers were in any given year after middle age, the study reported. The findings, the authors concluded, supported an “epigenetic explanation.” The idea is that trauma […]

Read more

A bacterial protein is found to promote cancer: Research suggests suggests that bacterial infections may contribute to far more cancers than previously thought

The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) announced today the discovery that DnaK, a protein of the bacterium mycoplasma, interferes with the mycoplasma-infected cell’s ability to respond to and repair DNA damage, a known origin of cancer. Little or no mycoplasma DnaK DNA sequences were found associated with the tumor, which was […]

Read more

Great apes and ravens plan without thinking

Planning and self control in animals do not require human-like mental capacities, according to a study from Stockholm University. Newly developed learning models, similar to models within artificial intelligence research, show how planning in ravens and great apes can develop through prior experiences without any need of thinking. Researchers have previously suggested that ravens can plan better than four-year-old children. […]

Read more

Microglia react distinctively during inflammation: LIH scientists provide new insights into function and heterogeneity of brain immune cells

The NorLux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory at LIH’s Department of Oncology conducts research on brain diseases, with a special emphasis on glioma biology, drug resistance and systems approaches. Within this research unit, Dr. Alessandro Michelucci focuses on the role of glial cells and inflammatory responses. Jointly with team member Dr. Carole Sousa and collaborating research groups from LIH and the University of […]

Read more

Drug combination makes cancer disappear in mice with neuroblastoma

Researchers investigating new treatments for neuroblastoma—one of the most common childhood cancers—have found that a combination of two drugs made tumours disappear in mice, making it more effective than any other drugs tested in these animals. Professor Murray Norris, deputy director of the Children’s Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Sydney, Australia, told the 30th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets […]

Read more

Changes to RNA aid the process of learning and memory

RNA carries pieces of instructions encoded in DNA to coordinate the production of proteins that will carry out the work to be done in a cell. But the process isn’t always straightforward. Chemical modifications to DNA or RNA can alter the way genes are expressed without changing the actual genetic sequences. These epigenetic or epitranscriptome changes can affect many biological […]

Read more

Owls help scientists unlock secret of how the brain pays attention

By studying barn owls, scientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they’ve taken an important step toward solving the longstanding mystery of how the brain chooses what most deserves attention. The finding, the cover article in the latest issue of the journal Cell Reports, likely applies to all animals, including humans, and offers new insight into what goes wrong in the […]

Read more

Obese mice lose a third of their fat using a natural protein

To the great surprise of cancer researchers, a protein they investigated for its possible role in cancer turned out to be a powerful regulator of metabolism. The Georgetown University-led study found that forced expression of this protein in a laboratory strain of obese mice showed a remarkable reduction of their fat mass despite a genetic predisposition to eat all the […]

Read more
1 2