Citizen responder CPR and defibrillation programs may improve survival and outcomes from cardiac arrests

Implementing citizen responder programs to answer calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests may increase bystander defibrillation in private homes, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Resuscitation Science Symposium 2019—November 16-17 in Philadelphia. Most out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in residential areas, where automated external defibrillator (AED) devices are rarely available. Researchers in Denmark evaluated whether dispatching […]

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Therapy for neuroendocrine tumors may be improved by patient-specific dosimetry

In neuroendocrine tumor treatment, different methods of predicting patient response may be required for different patients, according to new research published in the October issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. By tailoring the method to the specific patient, physicians may better predict the effectiveness of treatment. “The present study aimed to develop a method for patient-specific determination of activity […]

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Lenalidomide may delay onset of myeloma-related bone, organ damage

The largest randomized trial in asymptomatic patients with smoldering multiple myeloma suggests that lenalidomide, a cancer drug, may delay the onset of bone and other myeloma-related organ damage. Results of the study, which was conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and funded by the National Cancer Institute, were published Friday, Oct. 25, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. “Our […]

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Medical alarms may be inaudible to hospital staff

Thousands of alarms are generated each day in any given hospital, but there are many reasons why humans may fail to respond to medical alarms, including trouble hearing the alarm. New research from the University of Illinois at Chicago looked at one common issue that affects alarm perceivability—simultaneous masking. “We know that our sensory system works as a filter and […]

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Your personality as a teen may predict your risk of dementia

(HealthDay)—Could your personality as a teen forecast your risk for dementia a half-century later? Very possibly, say researchers, who found that dementia risk is lower among seniors who were calm, mature and energetic high schoolers. “Being calm and mature as teen were each associated with roughly a 10% reduction in adult dementia risk,” said study co-author Kelly Peters, principal researcher […]

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Brain injury from concussion may linger longer than one year after return to play

How long does it take an athlete to recover from a concussion? New research has found an athlete’s brain may still not be fully recovered one year after being allowed to return to play. The study is published in the October 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “There is growing evidence […]

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American Airlines passengers may have been exposed to hepatitis A

(HealthDay)—Passengers on several American Airline flights in the United States may have been exposed to hepatitis A by a flight attendant, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. The CDC said the flight attendant had diarrhea on several flights during the period in which he was considered infectious, so it is investigating and notifying passengers who may have […]

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Late third trimester ultrasound may detect missed fetal abnormalities

In a study published in Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology that involved more than 50,000 pregnancies, a fetal anomaly was detected for the first time in the third trimester in one in 200 women who had undergone a first and/or second trimester ultrasound examination. Most of the fetal abnormalities (68%) seen at 35 to 37 weeks had already been diagnosed […]

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Rice bran may help curb malnutrition, diarrhea for infants

Malnutrition is prevalent on a global scale and has numerous negative consequences for children during the first five years of life. For some children, it can mean struggling with health issues for life or a higher risk of death among those under five years of age. A new study led by Colorado State University found that adding a rice bran […]

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Engineered T cells may be harnessed to kill solid tumor cells

There is now a multitude of therapies to treat cancer, from chemotherapy and radiation to immunotherapy and small molecule inhibitors. Chemotherapy is still the most widely used cancer treatment, but chemotherapy attacks all the rapidly dividing cells that it locates within the body, whether they’re ultimately harmful or beneficial. A new Tel Aviv University study led by Dr. Yaron Carmi […]

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