Survival for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma differs by race

In what is believed to be the largest dataset study to date examining the role of race on survival outcome for pediatric patients with Hodgkin lymphoma, investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey have found that black patients have significantly worse overall survival at five years than white patients when accounting for all available clinical variables. The work was […]

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Kidney disease: Senescent cell burden is reduced in humans by senolytic drugs

In a small safety and feasibility clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated for the first time that senescent cells can be removed from the body using drugs termed “senolytics.” The result was verified not only in analysis of blood but also in changes in skin and fat tissue senescent cell abundance. The findings appear in the journal EBioMedicine. This […]

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Cellular processes controlling the formation of lymphatic valves: Targeting VE-cadherin signaling pathways holds promise for treating lymphedema’s debilitative swelling

Lymphedema, resulting from a damaged lymphatic system, can be a debilitating disease in which excess protein-rich fluid (lymph) collects in soft tissues and causes swelling — most often in the arms or legs. Symptom severity varies, but the chronic swelling can lead to pain, thickened skin, disfigurement, loss of mobility in affected limbs, and recurrent infections. While lymphedema can be […]

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Human cells assembling into fractal-like clusters

Tree-like branching structures are everywhere in the human body, from the bronchial system in the lungs to the spidering capillaries that supply blood to the extremities. Researchers have long worked to understand the cellular signaling needed to build these intricate structures, but new research suggests that simple physics may play an underappreciated role. The research, published in the Proceedings of […]

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Better tools, better cancer immunotherapy

In the journal Science Immunology, researchers from DTU Health Technology and Jacobs University in Bremen have just published their cutting-edge research demonstrating advancement in detection of a certain type of immune cells, called T cells. Improved detection of T cells have several therapeutic implications. For example, in cancer immunotherapy (a therapeutic approach that engage patients own immune cells) characterization of […]

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Study links progenitor cells to age-related prostate growth: As the organ enlarges, the risk for cancer and other diseases increases

The prostates of older mice contain more luminal progenitor cells — cells capable of generating new prostate tissue — than the prostates of younger mice, UCLA researchers have discovered. The observation, published in Cell Reports, helps explain why, as people age, the prostate tends to grow, leading to an increased risk for prostate cancer and other conditions. “Understanding what’s causing […]

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Researchers unlock cancer cells’ feeding mechanism, central to tumor growth: The findings could lead to new treatments by blocking tumor growth at its roots

An international team led by researchers from the University of Cincinnati and Japan’s Keio and Hiroshima universities has discovered the energy production mechanism of cancerous cells that drives the growth of the nucleolus and causes tumors to rapidly multiply. The findings, published Aug. 1 in the journal Nature Cell Biology, could lead to the development of new cancer treatments that […]

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Evidence a cancer drug may be extended to many more patients

A new molecular mechanism discovered by UT Southwestern researchers indicates that drugs currently used to treat less than 10 percent of breast cancer patients could have broader effectiveness in treating all cancers where the drugs are used, including ovarian and prostate cancers. The new study also revealed a potential biomarker indicating when these drugs, called PARP inhibitors, can be unleashed […]

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‘Can you hear me, now?’ A new strategy ‘raises the volume’ of gut-body communication

Throughout the gastrointestinal tract there are specialized hormone-producing cells called enteroendocrine cells and, although they comprise only a small population of the total cells, they are one of the most important moderators of communication between the gut and the rest of the body. Studying these cells, however, has been difficult. “Enteroendocrine cells are extremely challenging to study because we just […]

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Cascade exacerbates storage diseases: Researchers show that a defective degradation enzyme triggers a series of consequential damages

In rare, hereditary storage diseases such as Sandhoff’s disease or Tay-Sachs syndrome, the metabolic waste from accumulating gangliosides cannot be properly disposed of in the nerve cells because important enzymes are missing. The consequences for the patients are grave: They range from movement restrictions to blindness, mental decline and early death. Scientists at the University of Bonn now demonstrate why […]

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