Immunotherapy drug found safe in treating cancer patients with HIV, study suggests: Researchers seek to break down HIV exclusions in cancer clinical trials

The results of a study led by physicians at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center showed that patients living with HIV and one of a variety of potentially deadly cancers could be safely treated with the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, also known by its brand name, KEYTRUDA®. During an ASCO presentation concurrent with release of a study in JAMA Oncology, Fred Hutch […]

Read more

New blood test uses DNA ‘packaging’ patterns to detect multiple cancer types

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a simple new blood test that can detect the presence of seven different types of cancer by spotting unique patterns in the fragmentation of DNA shed from cancer cells and circulating in the bloodstream. In a proof-of-concept study, the test, called DELFI (DNA evaluation of fragments for early interception), accurately […]

Read more

Conquering cancer’s infamous KRAS mutation

KRAS is one of the most challenging targets in cancer. Despite its discovery more than 60 years, researchers still struggle to inhibit its mutated form — earning its reputation as “undruggable.” Yet, the hunt for an Achilles’ heel continues, as cancers driven by KRAS mutations are both common and deadly. Now, scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys and PHusis Therapeutics have […]

Read more

Measuring chromosome imbalance could clarify cancer prognosis: A study of prostate cancer finds ‘aneuploid’ tumors are more likely to be lethal than tumors with normal chromosome numbers

Most human cells have 23 pairs of chromosomes. Any deviation from this number can be fatal for cells, and several genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome, are caused by abnormal numbers of chromosomes. For decades, biologists have also known that cancer cells often have too few or too many copies of some chromosomes, a state known as aneuploidy. In a […]

Read more

Removal of gene completely prevents development of aggressive pancreatic cancer in mice

The action of a gene called ATDC is required for the development of pancreatic cancer, a new study finds. The work builds on the theory that many cancers arise when adult cells — to resupply cells lost to injury and inflammation — switch back into more “primitive,” high-growth cell types, like those that drive fetal development. When this reversion happens […]

Read more

Organ bioprinting gets a breath of fresh air: Bioengineers clear major hurdle on path to 3D printing replacement organs

Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D printing replacement organs with a breakthrough technique for bioprinting tissues. The new innovation allows scientists to create exquisitely entangled vascular networks that mimic the body’s natural passageways for blood, air, lymph and other vital fluids. The research is featured on the cover of this week’s issue of Science. It […]

Read more

Biologists design new molecules to help stall lung cancer: Scientists tie tumor growth to heme availability, build peptide to ‘hijack’ uptake

University of Texas at Dallas scientists have demonstrated that the growth rate of the majority of lung cancer cells relates directly to the availability of a crucial oxygen-metabolizing molecule. In a preclinical study, recently published in Cancer Research, biologist Dr. Li Zhang and her team showed that the expansion of lung tumors in mice slowed when access to heme — […]

Read more

Discovery of oral cancer biomarkers could save thousands of lives

Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that. Researchers from the University of Otago, New Zealand, and the Indian Statistical Institute (ISI), Kolkata, have discovered epigenetic markers that are distinctly different in oral cancer tissues compared to the adjacent healthy tissues in patients. […]

Read more

Cancers ‘change spots’ to avoid immunotherapy

Cancers can make themselves harder for new immunotherapies to see by ‘changing their spots’ — and switching off a key molecule on the surface of cells that is otherwise recognised by treatment. Researchers found that they could test samples from patients with bowel cancer to identify which were most likely to respond to immunotherapy by assessing molecular changes within miniature […]

Read more

Ovarian cancer patients undertested for mutations that could guide clinical care

Fewer than a quarter of breast cancer patients and a third of ovarian cancer patients diagnosed between 2013 and 2014 in two states underwent genetic testing for cancer-associated mutations, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and several other organizations. The findings indicate that substantial gaps exist between national guidelines for testing and actual […]

Read more
1 2 3 4