Potential treatment target for Crohn’s disease

There is no cure for the more than 1.6 million people in the United States living with Crohn’s disease (CD) and its symptoms, including abdominal pain, intestinal distress and severe weight-loss. CD is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in which the body’s own immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, and treatment is focused on controlling the symptoms of […]

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Researchers unlock cancer cells’ feeding mechanism, central to tumor growth: The findings could lead to new treatments by blocking tumor growth at its roots

An international team led by researchers from the University of Cincinnati and Japan’s Keio and Hiroshima universities has discovered the energy production mechanism of cancerous cells that drives the growth of the nucleolus and causes tumors to rapidly multiply. The findings, published Aug. 1 in the journal Nature Cell Biology, could lead to the development of new cancer treatments that […]

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SIRT1 plays key role in chronic myeloid leukemia to aid persistence of leukemic stem cells

Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia can be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. While these effective drugs lead to deep remission and prolonged survival, primitive leukemia stem cells resist elimination during the remission and persist as a major barrier to cure. As a result, the majority of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, or CML, require indefinite inhibitor treatment to prevent disease […]

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New blood test uses DNA ‘packaging’ patterns to detect multiple cancer types

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a simple new blood test that can detect the presence of seven different types of cancer by spotting unique patterns in the fragmentation of DNA shed from cancer cells and circulating in the bloodstream. In a proof-of-concept study, the test, called DELFI (DNA evaluation of fragments for early interception), accurately […]

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Removal of gene completely prevents development of aggressive pancreatic cancer in mice

The action of a gene called ATDC is required for the development of pancreatic cancer, a new study finds. The work builds on the theory that many cancers arise when adult cells — to resupply cells lost to injury and inflammation — switch back into more “primitive,” high-growth cell types, like those that drive fetal development. When this reversion happens […]

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Discovery of oral cancer biomarkers could save thousands of lives

Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that. Researchers from the University of Otago, New Zealand, and the Indian Statistical Institute (ISI), Kolkata, have discovered epigenetic markers that are distinctly different in oral cancer tissues compared to the adjacent healthy tissues in patients. […]

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Research implicates causative genes in osteoporosis, suggesting new targets for future therapy: Innovative functional genomics tools likely to aid discovery in other genetic diseases

Scientists have harnessed powerful data analysis tools and three-dimensional studies of genomic geography to implicate new risk genes for osteoporosis, the chronic bone-weakening condition that affects millions of people. Knowing the causative genes may later open the door to more effective treatments. “Identifying a disease’s actual underlying cause often helps to steer us toward correct, targeted treatments,” said study leader […]

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A new method for developing artificial ovaries

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) led by Prof. Aldo R. Boccaccini from the Chair of Materials Science (biomaterials) and Prof. Dr. Ralf Dittrich from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen have taken an important step towards developing artificial ovaries for patients suffering from cancer. Together, they have been researching innovative techniques for restoring […]

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Cancer genes’ age and function strongly influence their mutational status

Researchers have provided new insight on why some genes that formed during the evolution of the earliest animals on earth are particularly impaired (or dysregulated) by specific mechanisms during cancer development. Their study, published today in eLife, suggests investigating the implications of this dysregulation for the entire function of cancer cells may provide useful insights for the development of potential […]

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Malignant bone marrow disease: New hope for MPN patients: Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) — a group of rare but malignant bone marrow disorders

MPNs are a group of rare, malignant diseases of the bone marrow involving the production of an excess of red blood cells, white blood cells and/or platelets. MPNs are chronic diseases with only 1 to 2 new cases diagnosed per 100,000 people every year. MPNs can affect people at any age, but they are most common among adults around 60 […]

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