Augmented reality glasses may help people with low vision better navigate their environment: Glasses enhance mobility and function in patients who have difficulty with peripheral vision or seeing in low light

Nearly one in 30 Americans over the age of 40 experience low vision — significant visual impairment that can’t be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, medication or surgery. In a new study of patients with retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited degenerative eye disease that results in poor vision, Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers found that adapted augmented reality (AR) […]

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Smaller class size means more success for women in STEM

A new study demonstrates that increasing class size has the largest negative impact on female participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) classrooms, and offers insights on ways to change the trend. Using data obtained from 44 science courses across multiple institutions — including Cornell, the University of Minnesota, Bethel University and American University in Cairo — a team […]

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Need a Mental Health Day? Some States Give Students the Option

Depression and anxiety. The state of the country. Climate change. Mass shootings. Today’s students are grappling with a variety of issues beyond the classroom. To that end, lawmakers in two states have recently recognized the importance of the mental health of their students by allowing them to take sick days just for that. The measures “empower” children to take care […]

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Americans overestimate income for children from wealthy families: Public also underestimates value of a college degree in mobility

Americans overestimate the future income for children from wealthy and middle-income families, but underestimate that for children from poor ones, finds a new study by New York University sociologists. The research, which appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), runs counter to popular perceptions, as well as to some previous research, that holds Americans, overall, […]

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What we think we know — but might not — pushes us to learn more: New findings challenge the popular assumption that curiosity in general is the prime driver of learning

Spoiler alert if you haven’t watched the “Game of Thrones” season finale. If you think you know the farm animal most closely related to T-Rex, or the American president who inspired the creation of blue jelly beans — but aren’t entirely sure — you’re more likely to bone up on the chicken-dinosaur connection or Ronald Reagan’s predilection for glazed, gel-filled […]

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Unlike men, women’s cognitive performance may improve at higher room temperature

Women’s performance on math and verbal tests is best at higher temperatures, while men perform best on the same tests at lower temperatures, according to a study published May 22, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tom Chang and Agne Kajackaite from the USC Marshall School of Business, Los Angeles, USA, and the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, […]

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Half a face enough for recognition technology: Researchers achieve 100 percent recognition rates for half and three-quarter faces

Facial recognition technology works even when only half a face is visible, researchers from the University of Bradford have found. Using artificial intelligence techniques, the team achieved 100 per cent recognition rates for both three-quarter and half faces. The study, published in Future Generation Computer Systems, is the first to use machine learning to test the recognition rates for different […]

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Neuron and synapse-mimetic spintronics devices developed

A research group from Tohoku University has developed spintronics devices which are promising for future energy-efficient and adoptive computing systems, as they behave like neurons and synapses in the human brain. Today’s information society is built on digital computers that have evolved drastically for half a century and are capable of executing complicated tasks reliably. The human brain, by contrast, […]

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Mobile devices don’t reduce shared family time: New research shows that mobile device use is now embedded into family life

The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less — but not in shared activities such as watching tv and eating. The increase is in what is called ‘alone-together’ time, when children are at […]

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Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role

People fall in love for many reasons — similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. But if they marry and stay together, their long-term happiness may depend on their individual genes or those of their spouse, says a new study led by Yale School of Public Health researchers. Published in the journal PLOS ONE, the study examined the […]

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