New findings could lead to improved vaccinations against sexually transmitted infections

In a study published today in the Nature Communications, researchers from King’s College London have shown how skin vaccination can generate protective CD8 T-cells that are recruited to the genital tissues and could be used as a vaccination strategy for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). One of the challenges in developing vaccines for STIs, such as HIV or herpes simplex virus, […]

Read more

Over-fed bacteria make people sick

In a new hypothesis, a CRC 1182 research team suggests that inflammatory diseases are caused by an over-supply of food, and the associated disturbance of the intestine’s natural bacterial colonization. Since the end of the Second World War, along with the growing prosperity and the associated changes in lifestyle, numerous new and civilisation-related disease patterns have developed in today’s industrialised […]

Read more

Cell-killing proteins suppress listeria without killing cells

New North Carolina State University research shows that key proteins known for their ability to prevent viral infections by inducing cell death can also block certain bacterial infections without triggering the death of the host cells. Rather than killing host cells infected by Listeria in the gastrointestinal tract, the RIPK3 and MLKL proteins recognize the chemical composition of the bacteria […]

Read more

Congo's Ebola outbreak might be declared global emergency

A top Red Cross official said Friday he’s “more concerned than I have ever been” about the possible regional spread of the Ebola virus in Congo after a recent spike in cases. Emanuele Capobianco spoke by phone ahead of a key World Health Organization meeting in Geneva later Friday about whether to declare the deadly Ebola outbreak in northeastern Congo […]

Read more

International aid helps Mozambique fight cholera in Beira

As Mozambique battles to control a fast-spreading cholera outbreak in the cyclone-hit central city of Beira, international assistance is arriving. The number of cholera cases jumped to 271 over the weekend although no deaths from the disease had been reported. More than 500 people have died in Mozambique from Cyclone Idai , which slammed into Beira more than two weeks […]

Read more

TB: Promising new drugs for old pathogen Mtb

Tuberculosis (TB), an ancient and notoriously difficult disease to treat, has killed millions through the course of human history; and the antibiotics that have been used to fight the disease in recent history are becoming less and less effective. In the face of this reality, Dennis Wright, professor of medicinal chemistry in the University of Connecticut’s Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, […]

Read more

‘Test and Treat’ reduces new HIV infections by a third in southern Africa communities

New HIV infections in southern Africa could be reduced substantially by offering entire communities voluntary HIV testing, and immediately referring those who test positive for HIV treatment in line with local guidelines, according to new research presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, USA today. The HPTN071 (PopART) trial found that new HIV infections were […]

Read more

The threat of ticks Invasion in 2019: scientists warn more and more against dangerous infectious diseases

2018 was a record year for tick – 2019 could be worse In the year 2018, the highest number of ticks was seen, which was ever documented in Germany – a record-breaking year for ticks. Experts predict that this record could be broken this year again. In addition to the strikingly high number of young animals (nymphs) is also the […]

Read more

Bacterial immunity and infectious disease

Patients with cystic fibrosis are often infected by pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that infects the lungs and prevents breathing, often causing death. P. aeruginosa itself can also be infected by viruses, which can affect the clinical outcomes of cystic fibrosis patients. “Just like humans get infected by bacteria, the bacteria get infected by viruses,” said Rachel Whitaker, a professor of […]

Read more

Chlamydia attacks with Frankenstein protein: The bacterium remodels human cells for its own nefarious purposes

When Chlamydia trachomatis, the bacterium that causes one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide, infects a human cell, it hijacks parts of the host to build protective layers around itself. Inside this makeshift fortress, the bug grows and reproduces, eventually bursting out in search of a new target and killing the host cell. While scientists have known for […]

Read more
1 2