Recalling Positive Memories May Cut Depression Risk for Teens

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 — Recalling specific positive life experiences may build resilience and help lower vulnerability to depression among adolescents with a history of early-life stress, according to a research letter published online Jan. 14 in Nature Human Behaviour. Adrian Dahl Askelund, from the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, and colleagues used path modeling to assess whether […]

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Opioids Now More Deadly for Americans Than Traffic Accidents

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 — For the first time in history, Americans’ risk for dying from an opioid overdose is higher than their risk for dying in a car accident, the National Safety Council reported Monday. The chances of dying from an accidental opioid overdose in the United States are now one in 96 compared with a one-in-103 risk for […]

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Research confirms nerve cells made from skin cells are a valid lab model for studying disease

The incidence of some neurological diseases—especially those related to aging, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases—is increasing. To better understand these conditions and evaluate potential new treatments, researchers need accurate models that they can study in the lab. Researchers from the Salk Institute, along with collaborators at Stanford University and Baylor College of Medicine, have shown that cells from mice […]

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Maryland regulators: Is medical marijuana effective for treating opioid addiction? Answer: It’s complicated

As opioid overdose deaths continued to mount in Maryland last year, state lawmakers asked medical marijuana regulators to determine whether cannabis could be effective at treating addiction to heroin, fentanyl and oxycodone. The answer—not really—was submitted to the General Assembly this week by the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission. “A comprehensive review of existing medical literature shows that there is no […]

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New test aids decision between intravenous and oral antibiotics for childhood infection

A simple new test developed at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and University of Melbourne will help clinicians decide whether to use oral or intravenous antibiotics to treat childhood infections. Developed and validated in children attending The Royal Children’s Hospital with a common skin infection, the Melbourne ASSET Risk Score is the first clinical risk score to help clinicians decide […]

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College students at increased risk for SgB meningococcal Dz

(HealthDay)—College students have an increased risk for sporadic and outbreak-associated serogroup B meningococcal disease, according to a study published online Dec. 31 in Pediatrics. Sarah A. Mbaeyi, M.D., M.P.H., from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues used data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System and enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance to compare the incidence […]

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Wireless ‘pacemaker for the brain’ could offer new treatment for neurological disorders

A new neurostimulator developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can listen to and stimulate electric current in the brain at the same time, potentially delivering fine-tuned treatments to patients with diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson’s. The device, named the WAND, works like a “pacemaker for the brain,” monitoring the brain’s electrical activity and delivering electrical stimulation if […]

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Here's Eddie Murphy With All 10 of His Kids — for the First Time

Who’s your daddy? If you’re not sure, you might want to check with Eddie Murphy. The comedy legend, 57, has 10 kids — all of whom appear with him in a holiday photo posted by his daughter Bria Murphy on her Instagram. It’s the family’s very first photo all together. Check out this posse: View this post on Instagram Merry […]

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