Study finds most Australian teens not doing enough physical activity

Nearly 90 percent of Australian children aged 11 to 17 are not meeting current recommendations on daily physical activity, according to an international study by researchers at the World Health Organization. The study, published today in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, and co-authored by The University of Western Australia’s Professor Fiona Bull, says that recommendations of one hour per […]

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Deaths increase under new heart donor system, research team finds

Deaths following heart transplants have increased in the year after a new allocation system was put in place to reduce wait times and prioritize donor organs for the sickest patients. The finding by Dr. Rebecca Cogswell at the University of Minnesota and colleagues is a preliminary look at the effect of the new system for deciding which donor hearts go […]

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Study finds links between early screen exposure, sleep disruption and EBD in kids

Digital media have become an integral part of lifestyles in recent years, and the ubiquity of digital devices coupled with poor screen use habits can have a detrimental effect on the developmental and psychosocial well-being of children. A new study by KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital (KKH), together with National University of Singapore, has found that first exposure earlier than […]

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Study finds new option for liver transplant patients

A drug commonly used to treat both asthma and inflammatory bowel disease, budesonide, may also be useful as an anti-organ rejection medication for liver transplant patients leading to fewer serious side effects than the most commonly used therapy, according to a University of Cincinnati researcher. Dr. Khurram Bari, an associate professor in the UC Division of Digestive Diseases, explains the […]

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Study finds racial disparities in treatment of multiple myeloma patients

Among patients with multiple myeloma, African Americans and Hispanics start treatment with a novel therapy significantly later than white patients, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. The study found that on average it took about three months for white patients to start novel therapy after diagnosis, while for both African Americans and Hispanics it took about […]

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Survey finds less than half of Americans concerned about poor posture

The average American adult spends more than three and a half hours looking down at their smartphones every day. Looking down or slouching for long periods of time can not only cause chronic pain in the back, neck and knees, but it can lead to more serious health issues like circulation problems, heartburn and digestive issues if left unchecked. However, […]

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Deadly IVF side effect is on the rise, report finds

Serious IVF side effect is on the rise, report finds as the number of blunders at fertility clinics reaches a four-year high (including one woman who was given the WRONG sperm) 156 cases of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) in 2018-19, up from 135  In same time, there were 294 ‘serious’ incidents at fertility clinics across the UK They involved damage […]

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Off-label medication orders on the rise for children, study finds

U.S. physicians are increasingly ordering medications for children for conditions that are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration, according to a Rutgers study. The findings highlight the need for more education, research and policies addressing effective, safe pediatric drug prescribing. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, analyzed data collected from 2006 to 2015 in the Centers for […]

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Smartphones could transform patient care, finds study

Remote monitoring using smartphone apps could transform the medical care of patients with long-term health conditions, according to new research led by University of Manchester scientists. The study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis provides the strongest evidence yet that smartphone technology could make best use of doctors’ and patients’ time when the data are integrated into the NHS. The study […]

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Study finds genetic testing motivates behavior changes in families at risk for melanoma

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, and melanoma is the most severe type of skin cancer. The National Cancer Institute estimates more than 96,000 new cases will be diagnosed this year, and the disease will cause more than 7,000 deaths. Utah has a particularly high melanoma rate. A new study led by researchers at […]

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