Engineering lymphatic vessels as a therapeutic to heal the heart

The cardiovascular system is a complex network of veins, arteries and capillaries. Within that network, lymphatic vessels are critical to the heart’s ability to heal in the event of a heart attack. When they’re functional, lymphatic vessels drain excess fluid that can cause swelling, and carry immune cells that can regulate inflammation and fight infection—each of which are a potential […]

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Sheaths drive powerful new artificial muscles

Over the last 15 years, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and their international colleagues have invented several types of strong, powerful artificial muscles using materials ranging from high-tech carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to ordinary fishing line. In a new study published July 12 in the journal Science, the researchers describe their latest advance, called sheath-run artificial muscles, or […]

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Synthetic joint lubricant holds promise for osteoarthritis

A new type of treatment for osteoarthritis, currently in canine clinical trials, shows promise for eventual use in humans. The treatment, developed by Cornell University biomedical engineers, is a synthetic version of a naturally occurring joint lubricant that binds to the surface of cartilage in joints and acts as a cushion during high-impact activities, such as running. “When the production […]

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People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices

The lives of thousands of people with mobility issues could be transformed thanks to ground-breaking research by scientists at the University of Bristol. The FREEHAB project will develop soft, wearable rehabilitative devices with a view to helping elderly and disabled people walk and move from sitting to a standing position in comfort and safety. Led by University of Bristol Professor […]

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Placenta-on-a-chip created to study caffeine transport from mother to fetus

Engineers have used microfluidic technology to create a “placenta-on-a-chip” that models how compounds can be passed from a mother to a fetus. “I am interested in microfluidics and I’ve been excited about using the technology to understand what happens in the cellular environment and within the body,” said Nicole Hashemi, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Iowa State University […]

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How game theory can bring humans and robots closer together

Researchers at the University of Sussex, Imperial College London and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have for the first time used game theory to enable robots to assist humans in a safe and versatile manner. The research team used adaptive control and Nash equilibrium game theory to programme a robot that can understand its human user’s behaviour in order to […]

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