Caregiver stress: The crucial, often unrecognized byproduct of chronic disease

There is growing evidence that caregivers of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) are vulnerable to developing their own poor cardiovascular health. Investigators report in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, published by Elsevier, on a proof-of-concept couples-based intervention in a cardiac rehabilitation setting. This intervention has shown potential for reducing caregiver distress, and future studies are evaluating its impact on both […]

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Improving outcomes for sepsis patients

More than 1 million sepsis survivors are discharged annually from acute care hospitals in the United States. Although the majority of these patients receive post-acute care (PAC) services, with over a third coming to home health care (HHC), sepsis survivors account for a majority of readmissions nationwide. Effective interventions are needed to decrease these poor outcomes. A national study from […]

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Veteran-directed care program is effective: Study suggests popular program that gives veterans flexible budgets for at-home caregivers should be expanded nationwide

A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System researchers finds that a program that gives veterans flexible budgets for at-home caregivers is at least as effective as other veteran purchased-care services. Published in the June issue of Health Affairs, the study shows that, although the average enrollee in the Veterans […]

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Physical and mental health of seniors linked to optimism, wisdom and loneliness: Findings can be used to develop new, health-focused interventions in aging populations

Ten thousand Baby Boomers turn 65 every day. By 2029, the entire generation born between 1946 and 1964 will be at least that old. What happens next concerns millions of Americans. Advancing age is broadly associated with declining cognitive, physical and mental health. In a new study of older adults living independently in a senior continuing care facility, researchers at […]

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Low scam awareness in old age may be an early sign of impending cognitive decline and dementia

Low scam awareness in older people is associated with risk for developing Alzheimer dementia or mild cognitive impairment in the future. These findings suggest that changes in social judgment occur before changes in thinking or memory are recognizable. Findings from a prospective cohort study are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. Identifying predictors of dementia and mild cognitive impairment is […]

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Genetic factor that can help or hurt risk for heart disease

Atherosclerotic disease, the slow and silent hardening and narrowing of the arteries, is a leading cause of mortality worldwide, responsible for more than 15 million deaths each year, including an estimated 610,000 people in the United States. Now, researchers may know one more reason why some people are more prone to develop the disease. In a paper published this month […]

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