Body composition shown to affect energy spent standing versus sitting: Findings support increased standing time as a simple way to boost energy expenditure

A person’s body composition could influence the difference between the amount of energy they spend while sitting versus standing, according to new research published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. Conducted by Francisco J. Amaro-Gahete of the University of Granada, Spain, and colleagues, this work adds to mounting evidence that more energy is expended while standing than while sitting or […]

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Veteran-directed care program is effective: Study suggests popular program that gives veterans flexible budgets for at-home caregivers should be expanded nationwide

A new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System researchers finds that a program that gives veterans flexible budgets for at-home caregivers is at least as effective as other veteran purchased-care services. Published in the June issue of Health Affairs, the study shows that, although the average enrollee in the Veterans […]

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Physical activity in preschool years can affect future heart health

Physical activity in early childhood may have an impact on cardiovascular health later in life, according to new research from McMaster University, where scientists followed the activity levels of hundreds of preschoolers over a period of years. They found that physical activity in children as young as three years old benefits blood vessel health, cardiovascular fitness and is key to […]

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Short-term use of opioids increases subjective pleasure: Risk of addiction

The human opioid system contributes to the regulation of emotions, pleasure and pain. Opioids are strong analgesics. In addition to effectively relieving pain, external opioids may improve mood and reduce negative emotions. However, not much has been known about the effect of opioids on emotional responses caused by external stimuli. Together with their colleagues from Aalto University and the University […]

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Defects in heart valve cilia during fetal development cause mitral valve prolapse

Genetic variation in heart valve cells of the developing fetus create the blueprint for the later development of mitral valve prolapse, according to the cover story of today’s Science Translational Medicine. The mutations cause defects in antenna-like cellular structures called primary cilia that previously had no known function in the heart valves. These findings were made possible by an international […]

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Tracking symptoms: New tool helps providers identify underlying causes: SymTrak advances clinicians toward next generation of population health management

An easy to use, brief, inexpensive new tool developed and validated by researchers at the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University will help healthcare providers track and potentially identify early onset of more complex, serious underlying issues that could otherwise go undetected. The tool tracks symptoms such as pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, memory problems, anxiety and depression in older adults enabling […]

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How big data can be used for personal health

Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators followed a cohort of more than 100 people over several years, tracking the biology of what makes them them. Now, after collecting extensive data on the group’s genetic and molecular makeup, the researchers are piecing together a new understanding of what it means to be healthy and how deviations […]

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Heart patch could limit muscle damage in heart attack aftermath

Researchers have designed a new type of adhesive patch that can be placed directly on the heart and may one day help to reduce the stretching of heart muscle that often occurs after a heart attack. The patch, made from a water-based hydrogel material, was developed using computer simulations of heart function in order to fine tune the material’s mechanical […]

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Genetic analysis has potential to transform diagnosis and treatment of adults with liver disease of unknown cause

Adults suffering from liver disease of unknown cause represent an understudied and underserved patient population. A new study reported in the Journal of Hepatology, published by Elsevier, supports the incorporation of whole-exome sequencing (WES) in the diagnosis and management of adults suffering from unexplained liver disease and underscores its value in developing an understanding of which liver phenotypes of unknown […]

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Ageism linked to poorer health in older people in England

Ageism may be linked with poorer health in older people in England, according to an observational study of over 7,500 people aged over 50 published in The Lancet Public Health journal. Despite the known prevalence of age discrimination and existing evidence that other forms of discrimination, like racism, are linked to poorer health, this is the first study to examine […]

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