Seeing it both ways: Visual perspective in memory: Recalling memories from first- or third-person can change how well you remember them over time

Think of a memory from your childhood. Are you seeing the memory through your own eyes, or can you see yourself, while viewing that child as if you were an observer? “If memory was simply an exact recollection of our experiences, one would think that we would recall our early memories from the first-person perspective,” said Peggy St Jacques, assistant […]

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Psychiatric illnesses are common in adults and children with kidney failure: Such illnesses were linked with a higher risk of early death in adult patients

New research indicates that psychiatric illnesses are common in children and adults with kidney failure, and hospitalizations for such illnesses are associated with a higher risk of early death in adults. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of CJASN, suggest that clinicians who care for hospitalized patients with kidney failure should be aware of and prepared to manage […]

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Novel school improvement program can raise teaching quality while reducing inequality

A multi-national European study, looking at over 5,500 students, has found that a novel school intervention program can not only improve the mathematics scores of primary school children from disadvantaged areas, but can also lessen the achievement gap caused by socioeconomic status. Known as the Dynamic Approach to School Improvement (DASI), the program is based on the latest findings in […]

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Older adults: Daunted by a new task? Learn 3 instead: Learning multiple things simultaneously increases cognitive abilities in older adults

Learning several new things at once increases cognitive abilities in older adults, according to new research from UC Riverside. UCR psychologist Rachel Wu says one important way of staving off cognitive decline is learning new skills as a child would. That is, be a sponge: seek new skills to learn; maintain motivation as fuel; rely on encouraging mentors to guide […]

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New technique developed to detect autism in children

Researchers have developed a new technique to help doctors more quickly and accurately detect autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children. In a study led by the University of Waterloo, researchers characterized how children with ASD scan a person’s face differently than a neuro-typical child. Based on the findings, the researchers were able to develop a technique that considers how a […]

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Skinny self-image, heavy workouts in adolescence are warning signs, study shows: 22 percent of young men, 5 percent of young women engage in ‘disordered eating’ to bulk up

Adolescents who see themselves as puny and who exercise to gain weight may be at risk of so-called muscularity-oriented disordered eating behaviors, say researchers led by UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals. The researchers found that 22 percent of males and 5 percent of females ages 18-to-24 exhibit these disordered eating behaviors, which are defined as including at least one of the […]

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Physical activity in preschool years can affect future heart health

Physical activity in early childhood may have an impact on cardiovascular health later in life, according to new research from McMaster University, where scientists followed the activity levels of hundreds of preschoolers over a period of years. They found that physical activity in children as young as three years old benefits blood vessel health, cardiovascular fitness and is key to […]

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Young athletes may need one-year break after knee surgery

After surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, young athletes are now recommended to undergo at least a year’s rehab and thorough testing before resuming knee-strenuous sport. Research shows that those who return to sport relatively soon after surgery incur a highly elevated risk of a second ACL injury. “What’s absolutely essential is to let the rehab take time. Every […]

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Home-schoolers see no added health risks over time: Better sleep, diet habits help counter shortfalls in formal exercise

Years of home-schooling don’t appear to influence the general health of children, according to a Rice University study. A report by Rice kinesiology lecturer Laura Kabiri and colleagues in the Oxford University Press journal Health Promotion International puts forth evidence that the amount of time a student spends in home school is “weakly or not at all related to multiple […]

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Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to reduced brain connectivity

More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior. The study appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. “Disruptive behaviors such […]

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