Proposed gene therapy for a heart arrhythmia, based on models made from patient cells

Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital report creating the first human tissue model of an inherited heart arrhythmia, replicating two patients’ abnormal heart rhythms in a dish, and then suppressing the arrhythmia with gene therapy in a mouse model. Their work, published in two papers in the July 30 print issue of the journal Circulation, opens the possibility of developing single-dose […]

Read more

A genomic barcode tracker for immune cells

Researchers from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research have developed a new method to spot rare immune cells that are reactive against cancer cells, from within a patient’s own immune system. The patented ‘RAGE-seq’ method enables scientists to track how immune cells evolve inside tumour tissue for the first time, revealing unprecedented insight into how to better arm the immune […]

Read more

New evidence shows cytotoxic T cells can identify, invade, and destroy targets of large mass like T. gondii tissue cysts

CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes can kill host cells infected with various microorganisms as well as single individual cancer cells through direct cell-to-cell contact, but their ability to destroy a target of large mass remains unexplored. A study in The American Journal of Pathology provided novel evidence on the capability of the immune system to eliminate large parasite-filled cysts associated with […]

Read more

SIRT1 plays key role in chronic myeloid leukemia to aid persistence of leukemic stem cells

Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia can be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. While these effective drugs lead to deep remission and prolonged survival, primitive leukemia stem cells resist elimination during the remission and persist as a major barrier to cure. As a result, the majority of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, or CML, require indefinite inhibitor treatment to prevent disease […]

Read more

Drug-resistant cancer cells create own Achilles heel

The cells of most patients’ cancers are resistant to a class of drugs, called proteasome inhibitors, that should kill them. When studied in the lab, these drugs are highly effective, yet hundreds of clinical trials testing proteasome inhibitors have failed. Now scientists may have solved the mystery of these cells’ surprising hardiness. The key: Resistant cancer cells have shifted how […]

Read more

A new approach to targeting cancer cells

A University of California, Riverside, research team has come up with a new approach to targeting cancer cells that circumvents a challenge faced by currently available cancer drugs. A cancer target is often a rogue protein that signals cancer cells to proliferate uncontrollably and invade organs. Modern cancer drugs have emerged that work by striking a tight bond between the […]

Read more

Why Hodgkin’s lymphoma cells grow uncontrollably

Although classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma is generally easily treatable today, many aspects of the disease still remain a mystery. A team at the Max Delbrück Center led by Professor Claus Scheidereit has now identified an important signaling molecule in the biology of this lymphoma: lymphotoxin-alpha (LTA). It helps the cancer to grow unimpeded—for example, by activating genes for immune checkpoint ligands […]

Read more

Detailed brain map uncovers hidden immune cells that may be involved in neurodegenerative disorders

Brains contain a variety of immune cells that play an important role for brain function. A team led by Prof. Kiavash Movahedi (VIB Center for Inflammation Research at VUB) has developed a comprehensive cell atlas of the brain’s immune compartment. This revealed not only the striking diversity of brain macrophages, but also uncovered microglia where they were not expected. Remarkably, […]

Read more

Same brain cells active during sleep and exploration in mice

Researchers have mapped the activity of individual neurons deep in the brain during sleep and exploration of novel objects in male and female mice. The study, published in JNeurosci, suggests these cells may facilitate memory formation. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons are active during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, when dreaming—and perhaps memory consolidation—occurs. Carlos Blanco, Priyattam Shiromani, and colleagues at the […]

Read more

Multitasking with perfection: Nerve cell works like 1400 individual cells

CT1 is different. In general, a nerve cell receives input from a number of presynaptic cells, processes the signals, and passes its output to downstream cells. In the cell CT1, however, each of the approximately 1400 cell areas works like a separate neuron. This allows CT1 to access information from all facets of the fly’s complex eye and to contribute […]

Read more
1 2 3