Scientists predict the areas of the brain to stimulate transitions between different brain states

A fundamental question in neuroscience is how to force the transition from one brain state to another, for example, from sleep to wakefulness, or in the face of brain pathologies, such as psychiatric diseases and impaired consciousness. As Gustavo Deco and Josephine Cruzat point out: “it is feasible to force the transition from one brain state to another by means […]

Read more

Researchers study the mechanisms behind learning and long-term memory in the brain

When we first purchase a smart phone, all of our settings and applications are the same. But as time passes, everyone’s phones will change drastically as we adapt them to our own individual needs and preferences. In the same way, our memories and life experiences are loaded into our brains, making one person unique from another. Even the simplest experiences […]

Read more

A model for brain activity during brain stimulation therapy

Brain stimulation, where targeted electrical impulses are directly applied to a patient’s brain, is already an effective therapy for depression, epilepsy, Parkinson’s and other neurological disorders, but many more applications are on the horizon. Clinicians and researchers believe the technique could be used to restore or improve memory and motor function after an injury, for example, but progress is hampered […]

Read more

How the brain repurposes unused regions

In adults that are born blind, the “visual” cortex is activated in a similar way during a listening task, according to new research in JNeurosci. The results answer questions about how development can override anatomy to influence brain function. Previous research observed that the “visual” cortex in blind people is recruited for other functions, but it was not known if […]

Read more

Stabilizing neuronal branching for healthy brain circuitry

Neurons form circuits in our brain by creating tree-like branches to connect with each other. Newly forming branches rely on the stability of microtubules, a railway-like system important for the transport of materials in cells. The mechanisms that regulate the stability of microtubules in branches are largely unknown. New research from the Vickie & Jack Farber Institute for Neuroscience—Jefferson Health […]

Read more

High-fat, high-carbohydrate diets affect your brain, not just your physical appearance

Much research has pointed to how an unhealthy diet correlates to obesity, but has not explored how diet can bring about neurological changes in the brain. A recent Yale study has discovered that high-fat diets contribute to irregularities in the hypothalamus region of the brain, which regulates body weight homeostasis and metabolism. Led by Sabrina Diano, the Richard Sackler Family […]

Read more

A sports unit changes the brain

Sport leads to a distribution of happiness hormones and increases physical Fitness. Many studies suggest that exercise also gives the spirit new momentum. Itself, a unique sport unit, improves mental performance to a similar extent as regular Training, as new results are now showing. Researchers at the University of Iowa have observed that a single training session improved the cognitive […]

Read more

Scratching the surface of how your brain senses an itch

Light touch plays a critical role in everyday tasks, such as picking up a glass or playing a musical instrument. The sensation is also an essential part of the body’s protective defense system, alerting us to objects in our environment that could cause us to fall or injure ourselves. In addition, it is part of the detection system that has […]

Read more

Tweaked CRISPR in neurons gives scientists new power to probe brain diseases

A team of scientists at UC San Francisco and the National Institutes of Health have achieved another CRISPR first, one which may fundamentally alter the way scientists study brain diseases. In a paper published August 15 in the journal Neuron, the researchers describe a technique that uses a special version of CRISPR developed at UCSF to systematically alter the activity […]

Read more

Virtual treasure hunt shows brain maps time sequence of memories

People have little difficulty remembering the chronology of events, determining how much time passed between two events, and which one occurred first. Apparently, memories of events in the brain are linked when they occur closely together. Using an experiment that combines virtual reality and brain scan technology, Jacob Bellmund and Christian Doeller from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive […]

Read more
1 2 3 7