Study suggests possible link between sugary drinks and cancer

A study published by The BMJ today reports a possible association between higher consumption of sugary drinks and and an increased risk of cancer. While cautious interpretation is needed, the findings add to a growing body of evidence indicating that limiting sugary drink consumption, together with taxation and marketing restrictions, might contribute to a reduction in cancer cases. The consumption […]

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What's the Difference Between Love and Infatuation?

You’re three months into your new relationship, and things are going well. You’re constantly thinking of the other person, you’re happier than you’ve ever been, and you may even feel some signs of jealousy when they’re around other people. You know it hasn’t been that long, but you think you might be in love. Some people swear that they know […]

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Scientists discover complex connections between social dynamics and diseases

Large gatherings—from music festivals to religious pilgrimages to sporting events—have long been known to increase risks of infectious disease outbreaks. Now results from an NSF-funded study led by UC Berkeley researchers associate even small-scale community gatherings with increased transmission of diarrheal diseases. The results are published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Gatherings at events can create environmental and social […]

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Between health and faith—managing type 2 diabetes during Ramadan

The holy month of Ramadan, which sees Muslims all over the world fast during daylight hours, begins this weekend. Does having type 2 diabetes exclude a person from fasting? Not necessarily. The decision belongs to the person, but getting some advice from health professionals can help. Diabetes is the fastest growing chronic condition in Australia. About 6% of Australian adults […]

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No link between autism and measles vaccine, even for 'at risk' kids, study finds

Measles: What to know What to know about Measles. Children who receive the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine are not at increased risk for autism, and that includes children who are sometimes considered to be in "high risk" groups for the neurodevelopmental disorder, a massive new study finds. The new study, published March 4 in the journal Annals of Internal […]

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Researchers discover clues to brain differences between males and females

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have discovered a mechanism for how androgens—male sex steroids—sculpt brain development. The research, conducted by Margaret M. McCarthy, Ph.D., who Chairs the Department of Pharmacology, could ultimately help researchers understand behavioral development differences between males and females. The research, published in Neuron, discovered a mechanism for how androgens, male sex steroids, […]

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New test aids decision between intravenous and oral antibiotics for childhood infection

A simple new test developed at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute and University of Melbourne will help clinicians decide whether to use oral or intravenous antibiotics to treat childhood infections. Developed and validated in children attending The Royal Children’s Hospital with a common skin infection, the Melbourne ASSET Risk Score is the first clinical risk score to help clinicians decide […]

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Our social judgments reveal a tension between morals and statistics

People make statistically-informed judgments about who is more likely to hold particular professions even though they criticize others for the same behavior, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “People don’t like it when someone uses group averages to make judgments about individuals from different social groups who are otherwise identical. They […]

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Targeting chemical signals between the gut and brain could lead to new treatment for obesity

New research published in The Journal of Physiology has shed light on how to disrupt chemical signals that affect how much someone eats, which could lead to a method for helping manage obesity. Obesity is one of today’s most prevalent public health concerns. In the UK it affects around 1 in every 4 adults and around 1 in every 5 […]

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Scientists shine new light on link between obesity and cancer

Scientists have made a major discovery that shines a new, explanatory light on the link between obesity and cancer. Their research confirms why the body’s immune surveillance systems—led by cancer-fighting Natural Killer cells—stutter and fail in the presence of excess fat. Additionally, it outlines possible paths to new treatment strategies that would see “fat-clogged” Natural Killer cells molecularly re-programmed and […]

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