Expert warns people not to turn heating up before bed during winter

There is nothing better than a warm, cosy bed on a cold winter night.

During December the nation goes crazy for anything that spells out warmth.

This winter we've brought you fleece bedding, fleece hoodie blankets and fleece slippers to name just a few.

But cranking the heating up before bed isn't actually a very good idea, this is because it can interfere with our sleep patterns.

James Wilson, who is known as The Sleep Geek, has warned that sleeping with central heating on can "cause issues" as it encourages "large temperature fluctuations" which our bodies "struggle to deal with," reports The Mirror.

Basically, a warmer than normal room could make it harder to fall asleep or disrupt your sleep.

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Instead, James recommends keeping your bedroom cooler than the rest of the house as this will "encourage the drop in core temperature we need to sleep".

He explained: "Often we are told the bedroom should be 16C to 18C but for some people that is too cold, so it is better to focus instead on simply making the bedroom feel cooler than the rest of the house.

"The more important temperature for sleep is the one between the mattress and the duvet, which should be between 27C and 29C."

However, James points out that if your duvet is too heavy it can make you hotter, so go for a lower tog rating.

While a memory foam mattress could also cause you problems, this is due to the fact the foam retains heat.

The colder and darker nights can have an impact on our sleep anyway.

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Speaking to Daily Star Online when the clocks went back, James explained: "When the clocks change in the autumn the impact is more long term, and with it particularly felt during working hours.

"The fact we go to work when it is dark and get home when its dark has an impact on how energetic people feel, with them feeling more lethargic, but also, sleeping worse at night.

"It is incredibly important for us to get as much exposure as possible as the nights draw in, particularly earlier in the day, and if you struggle to get it during work hours, maybe think about investing in a lightbox, that can help to lift your mood in the day and help you sleep at night."

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