Our social judgments reveal a tension between morals and statistics

People make statistically-informed judgments about who is more likely to hold particular professions even though they criticize others for the same behavior, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “People don’t like it when someone uses group averages to make judgments about individuals from different social groups who are otherwise identical. They […]

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Role of PCSK9 inhibitors in high risk patients with dyslipidemia

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder which is characterized by substantially increased Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Timely reduction of LDL-C is of paramount importance to ameliorate the risk for CV disease as patients with FH have a significantly higher risk for Cardiovascular (CV) events. Pro-protein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors have emerged as a very […]

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Sound changes the way rodents sense touch

The brain assigns sensory information from the eyes, ears and skin to different regions: the visual cortex, auditory cortex and somatosensory cortex. However, it is clear that there are anatomical connections between these cortices such that brain activation to one sense can influence brain activation to another. A new study by the laboratory of Associate Professor Shoji Komai at the […]

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Building passion when you’re not in love with your job

(HealthDay)—Here’s some career advice for the new year. Experts often suggest that people follow their passion when looking for work that they’ll feel enriched by. But sometimes you don’t have a choice and have to take a job that you’re not quite wild about, to put it mildly. But rather than feel resentful and unhappy every day, over time you […]

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Wireless ‘pacemaker for the brain’ could offer new treatment for neurological disorders

A new neurostimulator developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can listen to and stimulate electric current in the brain at the same time, potentially delivering fine-tuned treatments to patients with diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson’s. The device, named the WAND, works like a “pacemaker for the brain,” monitoring the brain’s electrical activity and delivering electrical stimulation if […]

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Rich people found to be more charitable if given a sense of control

A pair of researchers, one with Harvard Business School, the other with the University of British Columbia, found that when soliciting donations from wealthy people, it pays to offer them a sense of control. In their paper published on the open access site PLOS ONE, Ashley Whillans and Elizabeth Dunn describe their study, which involved sending donation request letters to […]

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Brixadi

Plymouth Meeting, Pa. — December 23, 2018 — Braeburn today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted tentative approval of Brixadi (buprenorphine) extended-release weekly (8mg, 16mg, 24mg, 32mg) and monthly (64 mg, 96mg, 128mg) injections. The tentative approval is for use of Brixadi for the treatment of moderate to severe opioid use disorder (OUD) in patients […]

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Using gene drives to control wild mosquito populations and wipe out malaria

What is the deadliest animal on earth? It’s a question that brings to mind fearsome lions, tigers, sharks and crocodiles. But the answer is an animal that is no more than 1 centimeter long. A few mosquito species, out of the thousands that populate different environments, are the deadliest animals on earth. Anopheles mosquitoes alone, transmit malaria through their bite […]

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Many say ketamine eased their depression, but is it safe?

Jen Godfrey (HealthDay)—Jen Godfrey couldn’t shake the “deep cloud” that lingered even after she found an antidepressant she could tolerate. Then a string of stressors hit—five years of fertility treatment and an 80-pound weight gain during pregnancy that left her with persistent pain; a close relative’s suicide; another who went missing; and her own divorce. It was all too much […]

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Edging closer to personalized medicine for patients with irregular heartbeat

In 2015, then President Barack Obama launched a precision medicine initiative, saying that its promise was “delivering the right treatments, at the right time, every time to the right person.” A biomedical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis has answered the call by making a significant step toward precision medicine for patients with a life-threatening form of irregular heartbeat […]

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